Friday, November 30, 2007

Daryle Lambert - Is The Sky Still Falling in the Art and Antique Markets?



I just received an email from a friend along with an article written by an art market analyst in Austrailia who states that the art market has been manipulated and that prices are years ahead of where they should be. Even the Kovel's are starting to quote the Chicken Littles of the world about the state of our industry markets. I really must say that if they truly understood the world economic considerations that are coming into play in these markets, they wouldn't be thinking like this. And, if the dollar doesn't strengthen, we haven't seen anything yet.

For this very reason, I recommend that my club members only buy the best for resale. Why? With the dollar so cheap, the world is just waiting to buy the best of everything in the American Markets.

When the dollar was king, I was buying everything I could get my hands on overseas. I couldn't spend a dollar at home, but my dollar was worth two dollars overseas. Overseas, everything they had for sale was a bargain to me. I bought Doulton, Daum Nancy, Meissen, Ruskin and many other things. I bought until my storage space ran out. But now, the tide is running the other direction.

I am telling my members that now is the time to buy the better items. There are more than enough customers waiting in the wings to purchase whatever we have for sale in this country. Yes, there will be a time that this will change, but it isn't changing now. But we can still make a lot of money.

Now is the time to be bold and to go where others fear to tread. You can't become a millionaire by following the crowd. You have to think for yourself. People like the Kovel's have made their money on prices going up and telling others what to buy, so, why now are they getting frightened? We operate in these markets today -- not ten years from now. So judge for yourself. Are these great markets or what? Let's make our money now, and let tomorrow take care of itself.

I wish I could buy some great Chinese, Korean, German, Russian or British Antiques, Collectibles or Fine Art Paintings. And if you know of any that you are scared to buy, let me know, will you please? These countries are buying back their history from American collectors now, at fire sale prices when you consider the difference in currency values. If the crowd is going one way, make sure you go the other way. You'll win big time.

On a Side Bar: Saturday at 10:00 A.M., Cindy & I will be at the Lotton Glass Studio Open House. 24760 Country Lane, Crete, Illinois 60417. Come on down, meet us, and see this fabulous glass being made right there in front of your eyes by the Lotton family of first class artists.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Thursday, November 29, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Hale to Ale - Collectible Beer Cans



Being that I am a teetotaler, I really haven't had the opportunity to collect beer cans much. But "there's money in them there cans," as we would say in the South.. The canning of beer started in 1934 by American Can Company and continues to be the most popular way to serve beer today. Storage, breakage, and the ability to cool it faster seems to be the reasons for the change from the glass bottles.

Where I'm from, most of the people that wanted to enjoy this type of beverage simply brewed it for themselves, but I guess in the cities, beer served this way was the rage. Until 1934, beer came in kegs or bottles.

Most cans back then, from 1934 till 1962, were made from steel, but later ones are aluminum. It has been amazing to me how the thickness of these cans have been reduced while still being strong enough to hold the drink.

The style of the beer cans has changed from what were called the cone top, to what is now called the flat top. The earlier cone top cans bring the largest rewards. The true collector tries to find cans that were opened from the bottom, but for the life of me, I can't understand why someone would have done this, but I guess they did.

Remember that condition is of upmost importance in collecting these cans. No dents, paint loss or rust can be on them, if they are the early ones. Beer bottles are also collectible, but I will leave that subject for another time.

There are people that, believe it or not, make their living today picking up beer cans on the side of the road. You may have seen them. As the price of aluminum increased, it made it profitable to collect these cans and sell them back to the processors. Did you know that in some state their is a return policy and you can return these cans for up to fifteen cents rebate? Just to throwing in a little trivia. Did you know that aluminum was more expensive than gold before the discovery of bauxite?

But let's talk about values. When collecting these cans, you will find that there were many bottlers, as they were known in the early years. The ones that carry the highest values are cans used by the least known of these companies back then. For example, a can by Edelweiss Beer Company might bring a few hundred dollars today. can you imagine what the person that drank it and paid only five cents for the can full of beer would think if you told him the can alone today would be worth maybe three hundred dollars? Another great can to own is the Storz Gold Crest Beer Company can.

Most of the older cans will still be found at garage sales, and when you pick them up for five or ten cent each, they will definitely make you happy when the final price is registered on your on line auction. By the way, when I was a kid, I would go the the ball games and pick up cold drink bottles and sell them back to the stores. That's where my spending money came from up until I was about fifteen years old. --Daryle
Today's picture is courtesy of Gene's Can Shop

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Wednesday, November 28, 2007

Daryle Lambert - Spatterware or Spongeware?



Yesterday, I introduced you to Spatterware and the exciting prices that can be achieved if you find the right pieces. I hope you didn't go rushing off to buy something and ended up with Spatterware's poor cousin, Spongeware.

The technique used to produce Spongeware is totally different than that for Spatterware. With Spongeware, the design is applied by a sponge or piece of cloth, and often the entire surface of the item is decorated. The reason that I call this type of dinnerware the poor cousin is because you will find very few pieces selling over $1,000, while with Spatterware, $1,000 is often just the starting point.

Spongeware is more primitive than the Spatterware, so therefore, it is far less attractive for using as decoration, in my opinion. When I spent my early years on the farm with my grandparents, there was always a lot of spongeware being used in everyday situations. In fact my grandfather used a Spongeware crock to make his butter in. But just because it is the poor cousin, doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t become familiar with it.

Looking through several books, I found that there are still pieces of this stoneware that you should be familiar with. For example, I find a maple syrup jug in blue and white with a bail handle will still bring over $1,000. Also a teapot might fetch up to a $1,000 if it is in mint condition.

In Hancock County, Kentucky, we didn’t make maple syrup, but we did have molasses made from sugar cane and real honey that we harvested right from the bee hive. These were always kept in Spongeware jars just waiting for grandmother's homemade biscuits and freshly churned butter.

It is amazing how so many of the items I see, like Spatterware and Spongeware, return me in my mind's eye to my wonderful early years spent of the farm. I am so thankful that writing for you gives me this opportunity to return to those times ahd share them with others. I've noticed that when people get to be a certain age, they long for some of the items that bring them back to their childhood days. I can see that there is comfort in that, and is probably the reason many people buy certain items. In fact, I just might go out and find myself a piece of spongeware to remind me of where I came from.

I remember some excitement on the farm one day when we discovered a bee hive inside the wall next to the chimney. Of course all the children were screaming and my uncles were setting the newspapers afire so that the smoke would scare the bees away. My little cousins and I all wondered if the whole house was going to be set ablaze. But, they did have the blaze under control and yes, we did get to enjoy all the honey later that day. I can still see that spongeware container. Yes, I do believe that God is truly in charge. - Daryle

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge here. here

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Tuesday, November 27, 2007

Daryle Lambert - Red, Yellow, Blue, Green, and Rainbow



These aren't Christmas colors, but if you commit these colors to memory, you might find a large present in your Christmas stocking. I'm talking about Spatterware. This is a soft paste dinnerware that originated in the late eighteenth century. While Spatterware is still being produced today, the early pieces were made in the Staffordshire district of England. And wouldn't you know it, colors can count when you are buying Antique Spatterware. In this instance, it can mean the difference between a few hundred dollars and thousands upon thousands.

Often, you will find these pieces decorated with flowers or rainbow patterns. Usually, he more colors a piece has the more valuable it will be. Sometimes there will be animals on it. The name "spatterware" comes from the effect that looks as if the paint was spattered on the piece.

My first introduction to Spatterware was at a farm auction in southern Indiana. At farm sales in the South, everything that is to be sold that day is brought outside and displayed on tables or wagons for the customer to examine. As I was meandering among the tables full of small offerings, I came to a wagon loaded to the top with dinnerware. Nothing looked very interesting to me, but I did take notice of some pieces that had, what looked like, painted flowers on them with spattered paint surrounding the flowers.

I thought if I could pick up a few pieces of this dinnerware, perhaps a tea pot or a couple of cups and saucers for a few dollars, I would use them as decoration in my house. As the auctioneer got closer to the wagon, I noticed people shoving in, trying to get closer to where the auctioneer was standing. "What can this be all about," I thought to myself.

When the auctioneer held up the teapot and began to chant, "Do I have one hundred?" I thought he had lost his mind. And then he kept on chanting. "Yes, I have one hundred, do I have two? I will take your bid at at five hundred, do I hear six? Yes, how about one thousand, yes I hear three, yes I do have four thousand. By this time, I was looking around to see if they could possibly be selling the house. But,no, it was just the teapot. And it finished at over $5,000.

You betcha, from that day on this southern boy started to look for this funny looking dinnerware with its strange looking hand painted flowers. In fact just this week in the Maine Antique Digest, I saw a creamer, just three and one half inches tall, that sold at Pook and Pook Auction for $7,605. Imagine that!

And, there are pieces selling for much higher than that. Wondering about today's picture? This plate sold through Conestoga Auction Company, setting a new world record for Spatterware. You might want to be sitting down for this one, though. That plate sold for a whopping $37,400. I linked it to the auction house page because it's so unbelievable. But, who knows what prompts someone to make a purchase like that. It just might have completed an entire set they picked up for an extremely reasonable price making this buy, all worthwhile.

Be sure to find some books that give examples of the old patterns. Then, if you run across this older Spatterware you can say, "Make my day." You see, most people will be like I was, thinking that you should be able to buy these pieces for a few dollars. Are they in for a shock.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Just contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message

Monday, November 26, 2007

Daryle Lambert - Antique Treasure Found by Member. Cecil C. Is At It Again.



I got a call about half way through the day from Cecil C. I am sure that you've heard me talk about him before. He is the one that I wrote about in the book 31 Steps to Your Million in Antiques and Collectibles. Remember the Kentucky Derby Glass that he bought for $12.00 and sold two weeks later for $12,500.00? This is my friend that never ceases to amaze me.

He asked if I was near my computer, and of course, I always am. He asked if I would go to AskArt.com and tell him what I could about an artist named Wallace Weir Fahnestock. Naturally I did.

I soon shared the information that Mr. Fahnestock was born in Pennsylvania but did most of his best painting in Vermont. His birth was in 1877 and he died about 1962. I hesitated and waited for him to tell me more about his great purchase, but instead he asked me to continue.

"The highest auction price for one of his paintings was November of last year," I said, "and it brought $5,700. So what have you found, Cecil?"

"Well," he said "I did find this wonderful winter scene with two little rabbits in it, about 20" bt 24". What do you think it's worth?"

"Are you going to tell me what you paid for it, Cecil? I know you already bought it."

"Ah, give me my momentary pleasure," he toyed. "So what's it worth?"

Well, I knew I should just give him the information. I was just feeling a little outdone by my own student. In fact, we'd even partnered on paintings in the past. I knew he didn't pay much, but I found myself wanting to know just a wee bit more than him at that moment. I put that all aside and told him, "Good job, Cecil. Looks like it's worth from $8,000-$10,000. Now, what'd you pay for it?"

"Only $800. So it looks like I did okay, don't you think?"

I knew at that moment, he was one of my finest students. "Well done, Cecil."

How does Cecil do this so consistently? He studies and he gets out there. He's developed an eye for high quality work.You can do the very same thing, because it is this commitment that gets the job done.

For those that say there are no more treasures to be found, I say they must not know Cecil. I am still looking forward to the near future when I will be saying the same thing about you.

About the time I was going to really give him the praise he rightly deserved, he said to me, "Can I ask you about something else?" What else does he have up his sleeve today, I thought.

"I might have found a really good piece of Carnival Glass. Do you have your Carnival Glass Book," he asked?

A Grape and Cable 9 inch plate in amethyst with the electric blue iridescent highlights that books for $500.00 to $800.00 was what Cecil found. It was hard for me to ask what he paid, but I did. "Sixty dollars, and it is in mint condition."

Now, I would call that a great day by anyone’s standards. Boy, do I enjoy writing these stories. I am hoping that in a few months I will have to get a new key board for my computer because I will have worn this one out telling the world about the great treasures the 31 Club Members are finding.

Today's photo is an example of a Wallace Weir Fahnestock painting, courtesy of Askart.com
Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Just contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message

Sunday, November 25, 2007

Daryle Lambert - The Best of Chicago Pottery - Teco




Many years ago I was at a neighborhood yard sale when I spotted a large green vase. I took a close look at it and seriously wondered why anyone would want to have it in their house. It was inexpensive, so I bought it anyway. I think I paid somewhere around $50 for it.

When I got home, I did some research and discovered that it was Teco Pottery, which, at the time, I had never heard of. When I found out that the vase I was holding could bring up to $2,500 I almost fell off my chair. I decided to immediately sell it, and it brought me $2,250. You can bet I will never look at that plain green color the same again.

Teco --The Terra-Cotta Tile and Ceramic Company was formed in 1887 by Williams D. Gates. This immediately became associated with the Prairie School movement and was included in most homes of the time that featured the Arts and Crafts Style. At the time, Prairie School and Arts and Crafts were new terms for this Southern boy. I was use to terms like Primitives and Folk Art, and these were the things we searched for in the South.

Frank Lloyd Wright, the famous architect, was one of the most notable members of this movement. I found his designs often imitated the great American Prairies that surrounded Chicago. This seemed to play in to his love of the Western movement that was happening in this country.

Some of the purists wanted to discount the value of Teco pieces, because there were very few pieces hand thrown, and most were massed produced. They had some of the largest factories producing pottery at the time and so their production was extremely large. In fact, Teco had over 10,000 different shapes in its catalogues. This pottery was primarily a commercial venture, and I am still rather surprised that it commands the prices that it does.

When others were making high glazed and very decorative pottery, Teco produced great designs and the highest quality pottery on the market. Most of their pieces are matt green with very little secondary glazing, however they sometimes do have a charcoal effect on them.

The variety that William Gates created with his pottery does amaze me, but even till this day, it looks common to me.

Damage to a piece of Teco will devalue it more than most other pottery, and as a general rule, it should be avoided. This is because it was mass produced, and true collectors will wait for a prefect example before they buy.

The larger the pieces in Teco seems to be where the value is. While many of the Teco shapes come in brown, maroon, blue, yellow, and pink, it is the Teco Green that is most valued by today's collectors and will bring in the highest price. Some pieces will bring tens of thousands of dollars at the better auction houses such as Treadway and Toomey Auction Gallery and Rago’s.

Be sure to familiarize yourself with the Teco mark I've shown in today's picture. Pieces of Teco will often have this mark stamped several times on their bottom and often the mark will be almost invisible.

So, be on the lookout for Teco, because it just might make your day. A good reference book on Teco Art Pottery is American Art Pottery by David Rago. Why not order either a used or new copy through our Amazon Link to help support the 31 Club Wealth Building?

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Just contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message

Saturday, November 24, 2007

Daryle Lambert - The Trend is Your Friend.



My mailbox was full of magazines today and each was filled with auctions ads. It looks to me as if everyone is trying to get their things sold before the market drops. But do I have news for them! The Antique & Collectible Market has a long way to run before the steam goes out of it. With the dollar collapsing and real estate in a free fall in many markets, where else are you going to put your money?

Foreigners are buying the best and highest quality Antiques and Collectibles from this country at fire sale prices because of the difference in the value of currencies. No, we haven't reached the top yet. In fact, the top is no where in sight. If we have a change in government that moves us toward socialism, we haven't seen anything yet.

So how do we take advantage of all this uncertainty? We must see the opportunities all this uncertainty creates. Remember, you don't need luck when you have knowledge. Educate yourself so that you will always be ahead of the curve. Art work, fine silver, jewelry, pottery and other rarities will always have value around the world. If we want to make money, we'll need to think about global markets and quit worrying so much about what is happening at home here. We'll need to be taking action in areas that we can actually do something about. All things change. When they do, we must change with it.


A house might drop in value here because of the credit crunch, but we can’t move it to China. This isn’t true of a painting. We can ship a painting almost anywhere.

Yes, the dollar will rebound, but when is the question. So, let's not be waiting for the event to occur. Let's take advantage of the circumstances as they present themselves. There is no crystal ball that can tell us how long this change might last, so let's not be a chicken little and bury our heads in the sand. We're going where the smart money is going. This can only be done when we are educated in the ways of the market place. This is what the 31 Club will be making every effort to guide you through. We want our members to be the best equipped individuals in the market place.

If people are rushing to get out of the market, it might be time for us to get in. They might be selling out of fear, or they might need money to make their larger house payment on the adjustable loans that are readjusting. We need to be ready to buy.

Local Auctions that aren’t well advertised should be a gold mine for our members, as there will be fewer people, and your ever-increasing knowledge level will help you immensely. Try to buy the best of these offerings, because that is where the true treasures will be found. Go to every house sale that you can attend, and look for the most expensive things offered. This isn’t the time to be buying two dollar items that might sell for four dollars. This is the time to step up to the plate while the iron is hot. We, at the 31 Club, will back up our members to the limit of our ability with our Associates Program. If you see something you might want to partner on, call or email us. Let's take advantage of these markets together. But you must be a member, first.

I believe very shortly, the prices that we are seeing for the rarities will seem cheap, so remember: The Trend is your Friend. Let's start the new year off with a bang.

By the way, I was asked what kind of painting I bought from Joan C. It is a beautiful little painting of flowers in a vase. I pick it up Wednesday and will show it to all of you.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got an Erte Bronze, "Femme Fatale", Lotton Glass, and many many more high quality items priced reasonably with no buyer's premiums. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees selling with us.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Friday, November 23, 2007

Daryle Lambert - Holiday Aside, Back to Antiques, Collectibles & Fine Art Treasures



Thank you for the little break over Thanksgiving. Too much food and football, but alas,another Thanksgiving becomes a chapter of family history. It was wonderful.

These last couple of days have given me time to think about where we at 31 Club Wealth Building have started and the wonderful progress we've have together on the road to fulfilling our dreams. We have had some fantastic success stories and I believe they are just beginning. Cindy, Chris, Clarke and I have begun to lead you on your journey to find treasure. We are only beginning to ascend our 31 Steps to our Millions, and what better way to do this than to have an open discussion where we can share our ideas, experiences and knowledge and a place to track our progress.

Membership is growing at a wonderful rate and should pick up now that we are into the Christmas season and people are beginning to buy Christmas gifts. Why not share our book and club with someone near and dear to you?

Content both on the website and in the blog is gaining popularity, and members are responding at a ever increasing. So if you haven't contacted us yet, drop us an E-mail with your comments and questions, and let us know you're out there. I would say that we are definitely on target. But that still leaves us to find the answers we are looking for on how to complete The Million Dollar Race. I think I have it. We need more information to work, with so here we go.

At the present time art work, both American and European, appear to be where the big money is. So, where do we find the knowledge needed to compete in this field? One suggestion is to find a set of the books by William H. Gerdts call Art Across America. This set come in three volumes. The East and Mid-Atlantic, The South and The Midwest, The Plains and The West. By studying these books you will familiarize yourself with the greatest artists of this country. There are hundreds of artist that most dealers will not have heard of, and if you find a painting by one of them, you will have found a treasure. I made a list of all the artists mentioned in the book on The South and Mid-West to keep in my wallet. You might want to do this with several books that list artists. After all, we know that it is virtually impossible to commit to memory all the listed artists there could potentially be great finds for. We'd really appreciate any support for the club, and you can help keep us going by ordering used or new books through our Amazon Link. If you don't find what you're looking for there, try Abes Books.

Sometimes the treasures we find might not be in dollar value, but be personal treasures, priceless in our mind and heart.

I participated in a service at the Glen Oakes Nursing Home on Wednesday night, which is something I've been doing regularly for a while now. When the service was over, a wonderful lady I know asked if I would visit one of the people that was not able to attend that night.

Joan C. greeted us with her warm smile as we entered the room. I found out that Joan had served others for forty years as a nurse until illness and the loss of a leg ended her career. She'd been married for fifty seven years, had five children and twelve grandchildren, was a member of Mensa, and had accepted Jesus when she was seventeen. We had a lot in common right off the bat. It wasn't until I started admiring the beautiful paintings on the walls in her room that I was pleasantly surprised to discover that she was the artist. And a very accomplished one. I immediately picked one of her pieces I wanted to buy, but before I could get the words out, my friend said she wanted to buy that one. I said, "No you don't!" We both laughed because she knew I had my eye on that one, and being gracious she told me I can have it. We prayed together, and I am certain Joan and I will become close friends. Wednesday, I added a real treasure to my personal collection from a very special artist. This personal treasure will always be with me. --Daryle

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Thursday, November 22, 2007

Daryle Lambert - Thanksgiving Greeting to All Our Readers



May you have a warm and restful Thanksgiving. We at the 31 Club wish you a wonderful time of giving thanks with your friends and family.

Cindy, Chris, Clarke and I are so blessed to have you in our lives. We pledge to do everything in our power to see that the coming months are successful for you. God has blessed each one of us in many ways and meeting all the members of our club through the Internet has been one of the greatest blessings for us. We look forward to the day when we can meet each and every one of you face-to-face.

These last five months have seemed to whiz by, but look at all we've accomplished working together. The website that Chris has put together is second to none, getting more and more recognition each passing week. Chris just put up the video of Joshua, if you haven’t seen it yet. I am so thankful that his wife and children have been so understanding during our start up period.

Cindy has been my constant source of strength. When I wondered if I had another blog in me she would say "Just be yourself." How thankful I am to have such a talented person to cover up all my mistakes. Wow, can she write or what? I was joking with her the other day that I was afraid others would see her talent and heir her away from us.

You haven’t heard much from Clarke but he was sure there when we needed him and he is waiting to be called upon again.

May your lives be richly blessed this Thanksgiving Day and remember -- In this business, you don't need luck when you have knowledge.
Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Daryle Lambert - HOW COULD YOU FORGET BASKETBALL COLLECTIBLES? Being from Kentucky? Go Big Blue



I no sooner finished and posted my Football Collectible Blog when a Kentuckian -- a relative-- asked me, "What about Basketball, Daryle?" You see, people from Kentucky bleed blue for their basketball team.

So to keep peace in my family, here we go. Yes, basketball is in my blood. To this day, I remember My Dad taking me to the State Basketball Tournament when I was very young.

Owensboro High school had a player by the name of Cliff Hagan, and you might recognize that name today because of his Cliff Hagan Boys and Girls Club. Our school won the tournament, but what stands etched in my mind the most was when they rolled out the table with all of the trophies. I couldn't believe all the gold and silver shimmering right before my eyes. To me, that table looked like a mile long.

Cliff Hagan attended Kentucky University after high school. There, he became an All American under the tutelage of the Great Adolph Rupp. Cliff had the sweetest hook shot I have ever seen, even better than Lew Alcindor (Kareem Adul-Jabbar).

My next greatest basketball moment was when Kentucky played a game in our hometown. I was able to get all the coaches and player's autographs.

Just like football, there is a never ending search for items signed or used in games by the upper echelon players and coaches. Signed cards, programs, jerseys, shoes by the better known players can bring tens of thousands of dollars, and even more if they are extremely rare.

Oh, if I could only own a jersey that belonged to Bill Russell or Wilt Chamberlain. What a dream come true that would be. Do you remember The Big O or Pistol Pete? Now, that's going back quite a number of years, but as a child, I would marvel at the gymnastics these player could perform on the court. In his day, Magic Johnson was one of my favorite players. I can still see him in my mind's eye weaving in and out before exploding toward the basket.

Wondering about today's photo? That basketball belongs to a 15-year-old young man whose mother is part of the 31 Club Wealth Building. You might not be able to make out the signature, but it's Michael Jordan's. This young man's father was able to obtain Michael's autograph, when he was making a delivery to Michael's home. It was signed in person, right on Michael's own driveway, in honor of a very special occasion in this young man's life. Now, this young man, who had also had the privilege to see Michael in action at the many Bulls games he attended with his parents, has a real treasure.

The rare pieces of Basketball memorabilia will only increase in value, and these may show up anyplace. So do keep your eyes open at every sale you attend. That special piece might be in that old trunk or in the bottom of a sack in the back of a closet waiting to be discovered again.

Go hunting. And remember, you don’t need luck when you have knowledge.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

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Tuesday, November 20, 2007

Daryle Lambert - The Bowl Can Mean more than Food.



We are preparing for that great feast,Thanksgiving. Bowls and bowls of delicious food. But there’s another type Bowl that is in the air this Thanksgiving that has nothing to do with food. The Rose, Orange, Cotton Bowls have nothing to do with food but they do mean football.

I played football because that was the thing to do at my high school. Even though I thought I was really good, now I know I wasn’t. I only weighed 155 lbs. But this time in my life instilled in me a love for the game. So, each and everyThanksgiving, aside from getting my fill of some really fine food, I usually get my fill of the game, too.

This brings me to the point of this blog. You see, a person could complete his/her 31Steps in the 31 Club Wealth Building plan, by just dealing in football memorabilia if they really wanted to. While we recommend that you widen your horizon to include many things, I have known people that will fulfill their dreams in only one field. My friend, Warner Smith, is doing this very thing with Lotton Glass, and I can assure you, he will complete his steps in the $1,000,000 Race.

So if you wanted to specialize in football items, you will find the field fresh for harvest. Individual players equipment, types of older uniforms, cards, advertisement, signatures,games, and the list can go on and on.

The great thing about sports collectibles, is that there will always be people that collect sports items. The market on these items ranges from the very inexpensive to the pinnacle of collectibles.

Don Maynard’s jersey from 1970, when he was with the New York Jets, could bring $8,000 today, Dan Marino’s shoes could be valued at $5,000. If you searched further back, I am sure that items belonging to Red Grange and others might well fetch many hundreds of thousands of dollars.

You can Google football collectible prices and spend a wonderful afternoon bringing back the history of famous players you remember from your past.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got an Erte Bronze, "Femme Fatale", Lotton Glass, and many many more high quality items priced reasonably with no buyer's premiums. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees selling with us.


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Monday, November 19, 2007

Daryle Lambert - Has His Eye on Van Briggle Pottery



One of my first loves is American Art Pottery. It was easy to fall in love with the beauty of Rookwood Pottery, because these fantastic pieces were made in Cincinnati Ohio, only about two hours from my Kentucky Home. The same can be said for Roseville Pottery, because it, too, was made in Ohio. But how I got interested in Van Briggle Pottery, made in Colorado, makes for a good story. This will show you that studying and researching one thing might just lead you down a very different path from the one you thought you were traveling upon.

I was quickly becoming a serious Rookwood collector a few years back, studying everything I could get my hands on that mentioned Rookwood. One day, I came across the name of Artus Van Briggle listed as an artist for the Rookwood Pottery Company. I decided I should add a couple of his pieces to my collection. So, off I went like a old bird dog trying to track that special piece I had decided was waiting for me to discover.

Having very little luck finding a Van Briggle piece over the next several months, I went back to my books. I wanted to figure out why I was having so little success in my search. I soon found that Van Briggle started with Rookwood in 1887 but stayed there for a very short time before moving on to several other companies. For reasons of poor health, he returned to Cincinnati in 1897 and worked for Rookwood another three years before starting his own company in 1901. Because he was actually only at Roodwood for a few years, his production there was limited. Now I had my answer for why it was so difficult to find pieces of his work at Rookwood.

He never fully recovered his health, so instead of beginning his new business in Ohio, he traveled to Colorado where he set up shop. Within four years, Artus Van Briggle died. After I found out more of his history, I made the decision to see if I could find some of his earlier pieces for my collection rather than his Rookwood pots. You see what I mean? You can never guess where this business is going to lead you.

I was much more successful in finding the Van Briggle pieces than I was the Rookwood. I soon realized that if I was going to collect Van Briggle, it had to be pieces that were made while he was living.

The difference in price for pieces made in the three years he actually worked at his factory and the later pieces was astonishing to me. I'll give you some examples. A piece made by the Van Briggle Pottery Co. after 1930 may bring less than one hundred dollars. But a piece made from 1910 to 1930 can fetch up to seven or eight thousand dollars. This was the period of time his wife, Ann, continued running the factory. But are you ready for this? A piece made by his factory while he was living, from 1901-1904, could bring $30,000 to $50,000! In fact, the piece shown in today's photo sold at auction in March of 2007 for $42,000 through Craftsman Auctions.

The mark on most Van Briggle is two capital A’s side by side. There is a wonderful book printed on Van Briggle called, Colorado Pottery by Carol and Jim Carlton. If you find it, be sure to add one to your library. You can check for used books through our Amazon Link right from our recommended reading list page.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got an Erte Bronze, Lotton Glass, and many many more high quality items priced reasonably with no buyer's premiums. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees selling with us.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Sunday, November 18, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Fire Screens & Andirons on a Frosty Winter Night


Winter is just around the corner, so this might be a great time to cuddle around that wonderful fireplace. On the farm, when I was young, we would fix egg nog and homemade cookies, huddle around the fireplace and tell stories about the great adventures that had taken place over the past year.

Now as I have grown older, my eyes see different things. Sure, I yearn for the times I spent with my family, but that was then and this is today. How can we take advantage of wintertime and what Antiques and Collectibles does winter afford us?

Andirons, Bellows, Fenders, Fire Screens and Tool Sets are just a few of the items used in conjunction with your fireplace. I would bet you have passed by several of these items in your searches, never giving them a second thought. I know I did, until I took the time to learn about them. I encourage to take some time to familiarize yourself with these types of items so you don't miss the boat the next time you are at a sale and these items are there.

At a sale, these types of antiques and collectibles aren’t displayed in prominent places. These usually are found sitting on the floor, behind pieces of furniture.

A pair of andirons with brass and wrought iron Square Plinths (square base at the bottom of a column) with swags from 1765 and 26 inches tall might command a price of $10,000 in the market today.

Say that is a little to rich for your blood? Then how about a pair of brass ones, Federal, with spurred arched legs and slipper feet for a mere $5,500

Brass seems to be the choice of the day. Urn Finial, Spread winged Eagle pair with Penny Feet By J. Bailey $7500.00 and then there are the Bronze ones, Putti and Sea Monsters , Italy for a fair price of $12,500.00. You may never look at Andirons the same way again.

But it doesn’t stop there. Bellows can bring over $1,000. Fenders $5,000 and Screens up to $20,000 or more. You might be have sitting in front of a fortune all this time and not know it.

You might research on eBay for antique andirons, fireplace screens and fireplace tools. Be sure to check the completed listings, as well, to see what items are actually selling for. You can even have them list the items from the highest to lowest price. You'll find many different price ranges here, while getting exposure to valuable items.

Research and learn. The average dealer will never recognize their true value but you as a informed hunter will be able to swoop them up at tremendous bargains. By finding things of this nature, it won’t take long for you to see the progress that will that together with the 31 Club Antique & Collectible Wealth Building, we are on the right track.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

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Saturday, November 17, 2007

DARYLE LAMBERT and the 31 CLUB ARE HERE FOR YOU. Just Ask.



Things can happen in the strangest ways. My friend, Warner, got a call from a gentleman named Ray, looking to sell two Lotton vases, and while they were visiting, Warner told him about the antiques & collectibles wealth building club I had formed, the 31 Club. Then, Ray told his neighbor, Nancy, about his conversation with Warner, and later I received a phone call from Nancy, asking if I would help her with some of the things she had to sell. Of course I will.

When I arrived at her home, another neighbor, Jan, came by with some paintings and prints that she wanted me to look at, and of course, I was more than willing to. The great news is that all three of these people joined our 31 Club.

So, the 31 Club has picked up three new members, and I believe that these friends and neighbors, working together, will all be greatly rewarded by joining with us. Ray might have a house sale for us to do, and Nancy has sereral wonderful paintings I hope to find a new home for at a fair price.

Our third new member, Jan, has a small painting she thought was by Robert Kipniss. She even had a certificate for it. Upon examining the piece for several minutes, I still couldn't find where it was signed. ask her if it were She said could never find one either.

Remember, never give up if you think that the outcome is still in doubt. I rubbed the corners of the painting lightly. and lo and behold, the faintest of signatures was there. That discovery perhaps took the value of this piece from $200.00 to possibly $3-5000.00. Not bad. And on top of that, she also had several Kipness prints. Friends helping friends. That is what the 31 Club is all about.

Not long after this visit I got a call from a Church friend named Jennifer, asking if I would call her sister in Pennsylvania . Of course the answer was yes. When I got her on the phone, she ask if the Altman print she paid $3 for had any value.

I am telling you a secret, because I havn't been able to get a hold of her yet. That print is worth about $585.00. That is more than a double no matter how you slice it.

I have added two new names to your memory list now. Harold Altman and Robert Kipniss. So be on the look out for pieces by both of these artist. Their prints, as well as paintings, can still be bought at bargain prices, and they can substantially increase your bank account. In fact, the 31 Marketplace and Gallery has some Robert Altman Prints that can be purchased at a fair price. Click here to view them.

I am so excited with the progress the 31 Club is making and every day, I see great strides being made in my dream of being able to serve others at God's direction.

For all you dog lovers, here's a little slice of my life recently. Joshua and I got a new dog named Bella, and boy, is she cute. Of course, Vickie threatened to throw both of us out of the house, because she had stated we would never have a dog. I slept on the bathroom floor to keep Bella from howling all night. There had been a few other problems that go along with having a puppy, if you know what I mean. But we do have a new member of the family, and she has already found her way to our bed. There's nothing better to see than a nine-year-old boy with his first dog.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Friday, November 16, 2007

LET THERE BE LIGHT - It Might Be Antique Treasure.



When Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, little did he know what he started. Yes, the light bulb provides us light, but with that came the lamp. And artisians the world over have taken that lamp to new creative heights.

Comfort Louis Tiffany, perhaps the greatest glass master of all time to this date, saw the light and wanted to create something beautiful with it. His creation came through lamp shades of stained glass panels. Now all he had to do was produce the most fantastic lamps that man had ever seen up to that date. Little did he know that years later, a single one his lamps would sell for over $8,000,000.

Now, I'm not asking you to go out and try to find yourself a Tiffany Lamp, but I am asking you to study the truly great high quality pieces, so you can learn to recognize quality when you see it. This will be your advantage over others. You can study and learn about these items through books, researching on the internet, and by going to antique shows where these high quality items are often found. I've written before in another blog about the importance of getting up close to some of these items at shows, and I encourage you to regularly attend antique shows to come face to face with these items of high quality. even if you never will have a chance to buy a Tiffany lamp, you can still have an appreciation for the finest. I will probably never own a Maserati, that's my dream car, but I still want to be able to admire it.

To set you off on your path to learning about the finer things, I'll share a few links here about Tiffany that will explain what a gifted man he was. Take a look here at these links: Tiffany Link. Tiffany Link. Then, do your own study by finding other sites. Just type in "Tiffany Lamps" in any search engine.

While you are studying Tiffany, remembe that I have stated that today we have a rising star by the name of Charles Lotton that is becoming the Tiffany of today. In fact, while Tiffany’s lamps were made of panels and the artistry was in the patterns, in Lotton's lamps, the artistry is in the glass. Time may prove that Charles Lotton is even a greater glass master than Tiffany, if you can believe that.

There were many companies that began to produce wonderful lamps that aren't as expensive as the Tiffany Lamps are today. Some of these companies such as Chicago Mosaic Lamp Company, Handel, Jefferson, Miller, Moe Bridges, Pairpoint, and Pittsburgh. With this many companies producing fine lamps there must be thousands of lamps just waiting for you to discover them. When Cindy attended the Arlington Park Antique Show with me, she saw beautiful lamps and loved the reverse painted scenic lamps produced by the Moe Bridges Company. I'm certain that one of these will eventually find its way into her home.

The lamps from all these fine companies can vary in price from a few hundred dollars to tens of thousands of dollars. "Quality Electric Lamps" is a wonderful book put out by L-W Book Sales in 1992 that shows a large number of these lamps in color, along with prices for that year. I recommend that you search out one of these books and keep it as part of your resource library.

In order to complete the early steps in our 31 Race to a Million Dollars, it's not necessary to concentrate on the older lamps. I have found that lamps at garage and estate sale can be bought for pennies on the dollar of their original price. Even at auctions, lamps seem to sell at very reasonable prices. Stiffel lamps are a good example of what I am talking about. I have seen Stiffel lamp sell for under $25.00, when I knew that on eBay they would bring $100.00. In the beginning of our treasure hunt, this might be a great way to get some of those early steps out of the way.

Be sure to examine each lamp very carefully for a mark. It's usually there. By finding that mark, you might see that lamp as a treasure where others have overlooked it. This little light of mine, I’m going to let it shine. Have any of you heard that before? I hope it brought back some good and warm memories.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got an Erte Bronze, Lotton Glass, and many many more high quality items priced reasonably with no buyer's premiums. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees selling with us.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Thursday, November 15, 2007

COMMUMITY IS WHERE IT’S AT - Can 31 Club Antiques & Collectibles Wealth Building Help? Let us know.



Your antiques & collectibles wealth building community is in action. I just received an E-mail from our members, Ann and her son, Andrew, asking if any of our members had a Microsoft Frontpage 2003 that they might donate to the program that has been set up for research to find the cure for the ailment Andrew suffers from.

You might remember my earlier blog about Andrew and the zest for life that he maintains. I will never forget the statement Andrew made to me when he and his mother came to visit me. He said, "I live in the moment." If this community can help, it would be so greatly appreciated.

This program is called FD NOW, an abbreviation for Familial Dysautonomia. What Andrew suffers from is a fatal neurological disease. To find out more about this you can call 1-847-913-0455.

We, the members of the 31 Club, are out front when it comes to researching and sharing our lives, our stories, and our information & knowledge with others. This is why I can say that, and this is just one recent discover we've made that won't be found in any book.

The couple we acquired three Charles Lotton Miniatures from shared this great story with us recently:

In 1972, when Charles Lotton was just getting started as a glass artist, he visited Lilian Nassau, a noted Tiffany dealer in New York who had an interest in his work. During that trip to New York, he happened to meet another couple, Howard & Paula Ellman, who right on the spot, purchased the very first Magnum Paper Weight Charles Lotton created. This wonderful, extremely large piece still adorns their home and as friends come by, they usually ask the Ellman's, "Where did you get that Tiffany?" The Ellmans also purchased several other pieces from Charles, three being the minatures.

Here's where the story gets most interesting. Upon looking at the paperweight, Mr. Ellman noticed that it wasn't signed. He told Charles that, one day, his work was going to be very famous, and he should sign and date each piece. Charles thought that this suggestion was a good one, so ever since, he has signed and dated each piece. I called Charles to ask him about this, and he confirmed this story.

Cindy is doing a wonderful job getting our message out and I think that you will be hearing more about Lotton Glass in the days ahead.

The Old Turkey is gobbling, and the apples are ripening, so that must mean we are approaching Thanksgiving. This Holiday doesn’t get as much attention as others, but there are still great pieces that advertised this Holiday, and they can bring you a pretty penny. Pre-1950 Pilgrim tin signs and cardboard stand ups could substantially fatten your wallet. Get the pun? Also, any original clothing would command a fairly healthy price.

Don’t forget Christmas is just around the corner, and you could be stocking up on items to sell for this Holiday. We encourage all our readers and members to consider our book/membership 31 Steps to Your Millions in Antiques & Collectibles, as gifts for your friends and family members. It's not just a book, it's a living, breathing link into a community of like-minded people, willing to share their lives and resources year in and year out.

Over the next two months, this country will come together to celebrate the holidays. My hope is that all will give thanks to God for all that he has provided and continues to provide for us each and every day.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got an Erte Bronze, Lotton Glass, and many many more high quality items priced reasonably with no buyer's premiums. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees selling with us.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Wednesday, November 14, 2007

TROUBLE AT HOME - Make Storage Considerations a Priority for your Antiques & Collectibles.



WOW, did I stir up a hornets nest at home! The scolding started as soon as my wife, Vickie, got home from work and didn’t end until my business partner, Cindy, had her say.

My statement in yesterday's blog sure got some peoples attention, and for that I am thankful. But if it offended anyone, for that I would like to apologize. Yes, I guess I got a little emotional, but in the Bible, God said he knew David’s heart, and I hope my readers know mine.

Now that I have that off my chest, let’s talk about the business at hand. You see, on your road to wealth building with antiques & collectibles, there can be other troubles at home, if you don’t prepare properly before you buy things, whether you decide to keep them, or sell them.

I just had one of those examples where I didn’t follow my own advise. I bought two gasoline airplanes at auction at what I thought was a bargain. My intention was to keep one for Joshua and sell the other. But, they are so large that one must stay in my truck, while the other is hanging from the family room ceiling. Now you know why Vicki was so hot.

You see, I had forgotten to think about where I would store these items until they were sold, or where I would keep one if I wanted it for our personal collection. This didn’t make my wife very happy, and I'm sure you can imagine her response to this. Another strike against me I would rather forget.

So, when you are out there hunting for those treasures, be sure to think about what your going to do with the items that you purchase. Moving, hauling, storing and shipping should be major considerations in each purchase. Whatever you buy, you must carefully consider how it can be appropriately displayed in your house, whether you intend to sell it or to keep it.

The best thing to do is to prepare a separate storage area in advance for items you will be selling. This way, if you have people visiting, it will be convenient to show off the items that are for sale in your home. If you don’t do this, you will be bothered having to say this isn’t for sale, no that isn’t for sale either.

If art is your passion, like it is mine, this presents special problems. Where are you going to hang the pieces you purchase? In my case, I don’t have a empty wall left, and -- you guessed it -- Vicki isn't very happy about that. In fact, she tells her fiends that she never knows what she is coming home to because I am constantly changing our decor.

Paintings should always stored in a position as if they where hanging so you must have space where you can sit them up, putting dividers between each piece. Art is perhaps some of the easiest things to damage, so be careful when they are stored. Each painting should be easily assessible so that they won’t be damaged moving it in and out of storage. The frames are particularly vulnerable. The cost to restore a frame that is only slightly damaged may run several hundred dollars.

Well, I got through that and I hope that now my home will be happy again.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got an Erte Bronze, Lotton Glass, and many many more high quality items priced reasonably with no buyer's premiums. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees selling with us.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert


If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

VETERANS DAY - Trench Art & Military Memorabilia



My father was in the Merchant Marines, and to this day, I can still remember how proud he was to wear that uniform. We have sent America's finest to war, and they have asked for little in return.

Watching television last night, I saw a young man talk about being a Marine. He said "I am re-enlisting because there is no more noble thing I could give my life for than for this country's freedom and the safety of its citizens." Wow, that is still bringing tears to my eyes as I write this blog.

But, I want to tell you the rest of his story. He has just written a poem about serving this country and there are many that are offering him large sums of money to pursue a writing and singing career. But, serving his country is where his heart is. I wonder how many of us would do as he is doing. I would hope that I could make that same decision, but I wonder.

During our many wars, there have been hundreds of thousands of young men marching off to battle, and the one thing that most all of them carried in their hearts was a love of this country and of the ones they were separated from.

In their loneliness, they often made things from old shell casings or pieces of metal such as vases, sculpture, and ash trays. Jewelry was often fashioned from whatever was available for sweethearts, and there are whole collections dedicated to this jewelry. "Trench Art" is what these items are often called, and a good resource for this type of art is a book called "Trench Art: An Illustrated History" by Jane A. Kimball. You can find it through our Amazon Link on our 31 Club Recommended Reading Page.

These pieces can bring good money today from those that appreciate their gift to all of us. Uniforms and metals are also collected, and it seems that we just might want to keep these brave young men in our hearts. What better thing could we do to pay tribute to our soldiers than to have their treasures around us.


When my uncle was a Marine Tank Commander, he took a little piece of aluminum and made me a bracelet with my name on it. I was only about two years old when he did this for me. I can’t imagine the horror that he was seeing, and I am in awe that he took time to think about a small child at home. God Bless our soldiers, and if anyone doesn’t like it, well -- they can kiss my !!!!. I cross my chest when the National Anthem is sung, and I nod my head when I pass a soldier. They deserve it.

I wish that I could write more but I think you will understand if I quit. It is hard to continue when I can’t see the keys. Sleep good tonight because it is the sacrifices they are making that give us that opportunity.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Monday, November 12, 2007

STARTING AT HOME - There isn’t a Better Place for Finding Antiques and Collectibles.



I am talking to several new members of the 31 Club each day now, and the first thing they want to know is "How much time will I have to spend away from my house?" The answer, surprisingly, might be quite simple.

Just today I was talking to someone about how to get started on the journey to completing the 31 Steps in our guide book "31 Steps to your millions in Antiques and Collectibles." Believe it or not, after a few minutes of conversation, I was able to share that they probably wouldn’t even have to leave their home to complete the first five steps.

You see, this person was a empty nester. They began to ask me what this was worth and what that was worth. So my question to them was, "Why don’t you start your 31 Steps with what you already have." They didn't know they could do that. Then they really started opening up, " I have things of my mothers I would like to sell, and how about all the comic books and cars my children left here, would it be all right to sell those?" Surely these could all be a great start.

Could you be like this person, wondering where you could start, when all along it's been right in front of your face. You might find that while you are ridding yourself of the things that have been stored for years, this time will give you a great opportunity to study in preparation for the time that you will venture outside in search of more Treasures.

Cathy, one of our members, was the first to bring this to my attention. She has a shop and asked if it would be okay to start with some of the things that she already owned. That started me thinking.

Most of use have found that after a few years, we decide that it is time to have a garage sale. Putting an ad in the paper we get up early Friday or Saturday morning and wait impatiently for the bargain hunters to come by. They say we are asking too much, and finally, we give in and sell our items at what ever we can get for them.

Now you have a better option. The 31 Club. All you have to do is compile a list of what you have for sale, and we will tell you the value, or where to find its value, and then the best place to sell these items. I promise that your return will be greater than if you were to sell them in a garage sale.

If you go the garage sale route, within two months the money will be gone, and I doubt that you could even account for it. But, if you do as we suggest, it can start you on a journey that will astound you. That simple beginning might be your way to comfort during your retirement years

A great example of what being a part of this wonderful group can mean to you comes from a moment I had at church yesterday. One of our church members who has recently joined our group told me about an Amberina punch bowl that she had. It had been her mothers pride and joy and had managed to stay in mint condition all these years. She was wondering if it had value.

The strange thing about this conversation was that a few months ago, I met one of the most knowledgeable people on Amberina Glass in the country. I assured her that she wouldn’t have to wonder about its value much longer, because I was going to get her in touch with this gentleman. The same thing happened when a lady asked me about some of her oriental items. I was able to direct her to a wonderful gentleman that could answer all of her questions.

Working together, we are going to move mountains.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

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Sunday, November 11, 2007

WOOD BLOCKS - This can be Confusing. Antique Prints




When I was a small child I played with wooden blocks that had the alphabet and numbers on them. It was great fun spelling words and adding up the numbers. People told me that wood blocks brought a lot of money at auction. This confused me, because I wondered how that could be. Yes, some of the block sets could bring several hundred dollars if they had beautiful graphics on them, but I didn’t think that was what they were talking about. I was right.

In the art world, there are a group of works called "Woodblocks" that are very special. These prints are made by first carving out patterns in wood then inking these blocks and placing the ink onto paper. Each color in this process is applied by its own block. Some pictures may require as many as ten or twenty blocks to complete the picture.

The Chinese did this type of work, first, a round 220 A. D. There are also records of the Japanese and even the Egyptians printing in this manner. Later, many artist from other countries started to produce these images, and they became very popular. Today it is not unusual to find Wood Blocks at auction that bring $10,000 or more.

Once you have seen several of these prints, it becomes easy to identify them. I have to admit, I personally enjoy looking at them. The work involved in producing these pieces require great artistry plus time. I think they should command great valve if they are well done.

If you have spent the time in your search to acquaint yourself with the names of the better artists that produced these "Wood Block" masterpieces, don’t be surprised that the asking prices may be rather low. This can play to your advantage. Why? Because there are very few people that have the knowledge to spot these items of value.

Let me give you a few examples: A Gustave Baumann, 11 by 10 inch print will commander prices of $7,000 to $15,000. A Helen Hyde 20 inch piece, $2,000 to $5,000. An Abraham Abramovitz 14 ½ by 10 inch print, $3,000. II could go on and on

Be sure to check every frame you see whether it is hung on the wall or not. You might find a real treasure sitting in someone's basement on the floor. Add these to your list of things you want to know. This just might prove to be wise judgement on your part.


Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

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Saturday, November 10, 2007

CHRISTMAS TIME - It's Not The Candy, It's The Container. PAPER - PLASTIC - GLASS - TIN



When I was a kid at Christmas, there wasn’t much in my stocking. But, I could always count on there being a couple of candy containers full of my favorite candy.

If I was lucky, and had been a good boy, there might even have been a few pieces of fruit. Then, under the tree, I would find one or two presents that I had been waiting for all year. These could be a ball, glove, or model car kit, and I would cherish them as if they were made of gold. It was always as much fun for me to see my bothers and sister open their presents as it was for me to open mine.

Next came the grand opening of our parents' presents. They were always things that we had made at school, but you would have thought that we were giving them Faberge Eggs by the way they hugged and kissed us after they opened them.

You know, I never felt that I was poor. With my brothers and sisters around me as I opened my presents, I knew that I was the luckiest kid in the world. Dad had just returned from the service, and Mom was doing the best that she could.

The family would all sit around the blazing fireplace sharinging what we could remember of the year. Hot apple cider usually was the drink of the day, and we would eat Mom's homemade cookies. Now before I get too sentimental, let's get back to those candy containers.

I wish that I had kept all the containers from years past, because they have become very collectible and highly valuable today. In fact the candy container tradition started back in the Victorian age, but didn’t really get going until the sixties.

I can remember the containers made of papier-mache and glass, but not the plastic or tin ones. And who would ever thought that the small toys bought for just pennies would later sell for thousands of dollars?

Let me give you a few examples. A airplane, liberty Motor, original Tin $2200. Black Cat with stretched neck $2950. Golf Bag $2500. Refrigerator $5600. Santa Claus $2700. And this is just a few of the better ones.

I threw away the wrong thing! I should have kept the containers and thrown away the candy. If you can find some of these, you will have a Very Merry Christmas indeed.

Let's not forget what this season is really all about, and God Bless.
Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.

Friday, November 9, 2007

ANOTHER KEPT PROMISE - Treasures Still Out There. Art Pottery



I will always do my best when it comes to satisfying a promise that I have made to you. Just a few days ago, I got a report about the great find one of our members made and his surprise when it sold at Cincinnati Art Galleries auction.

Here's the great report: Cecil R bought a piece of pottery just from his experience of looking at quality pieces. It was totally unmarked, but there was something about it that said, "You be sure to buy me," which he did.

This goes back to lessons that I have shared with you in the past. The more items you visually examine, the better your eye will become at detecting quality even if the piece isn’t marked. I am going to let Cecil's words speak for themselves. Here is a E-mail I received from Cecil yesterday.

"Daryle: Perfect timing on the article about knowing quality. I recently bought a vase at auction that was not signed and I thought it may be a rare piece of Camark Pottery (which was made in Arkansas). However, when I got home I found that it was similar, but not Camark. After a few days of it sitting there, I had to put my "research cap" on and find out who made the piece. To my amazement, I found out it was made by Owens Pottery of Zanesville, Ohio and that it is one of the rarest patterns made by Owens! The pattern is called "Opalescent Inlaid" and was only made in the last year and one-half that Owens was in business, which was from 1896 to 1907.

The vase was not marked in any way, but I knew it to be a quality piece when I saw it at auction, just by examining the craftsmanship of the vase. I bid the piece to $25.00 and the auctioneer almost said the magic word "Sold!", when another bidder decided he like it too. I won the bidding at $80.00. Even though I did not know at the time who made it, I was certain that I would make a reasonable profit. Last week, the vase sold at auction in Cincinnati. The price: $2,400.00! Not bad for a piece that was unmarked and unsigned! CECIL"

Quite a story, wouldn’t you say? With in a year, I know we will be publishing several stories a week like this from our members. I am sure that your name will be among the ones we list. I would like for the ones writing the obituary for this business to tell Cecil that these aren’t the greatest times in history to be selling Antiques and Collectibles.

It won’t take long before you will begin to develop the eye necessary to spot these unmarked treasures. You see, Cecil didn't have any idea who made that vase. He only knew that it might have looked like a piece that he had seen previously by another company and was a piece of quality craftsmanship. It turned out to be even better than he thought.

Great guns! Just four more steps in Cecil's race to his millions from this sell. You bet I am sure that Cecil has read my book, 31 Steps to Your Millions in Antiques and Collectibles. The only worry I have is that he might beat me to the finish line! I am looking back every day to see which one of you is gaining on me and the 31 Gang.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

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Thursday, November 8, 2007

FIND THE MARK OTHERS MISS - Know Quality in Pottery, Art Glass, & Porcelain



If you can’t see it, that doesn’t mean it isn’t there. How many times have I had to tell myself that? I promise you, more than I wish to recall. What am I talking about?

I once visited a very high-end antique store in Los angles and found nothing of interest that could be bought and then sold for a profit. But, as I was leaving the store, for some reason I looked up at a top shelf where there were two extremely large vases. I asked the dealer if he would get a ladder and bring them down so that I could get a better look at them. Hesitantly, he did.

I examined the vases from top to bottom not finding a mark, but being sure that they were Doulton Lambeth pieces decorated by one of their leading artists. Going over them several more times finding nothing, I was about to decide that these vases truly were not signed. This is where persistence can pay off. Being stubborn as all that know me can attest to, I refused to give up. Turning them around in my hands another time, I finally caught a glimpse of three letters within the body of the vase, "FEB".

FEB, Florence E. Barlow, the sister of Hannah Barlow. This had just become my lucky day. The two Barlow sisters were Doulton's best known decorators, and their vases always bring top prices.

Why hadn’t others found these marks? Very simply, the marks weren’t typically where one would find marks on pottery. I am sure there had been hundreds of people who looked at the bottoms of these pieces, but after finding nothing, returned them to their resting place. You see, ninety-five percent of these vases would have been marked on the bottom. But, not these. And, on top of that, this mark, "FEB" had been incorporated into the actual design of the vase, making it almost impossible to find. But, not impossible to a persistant and stubborn man like me. The poor dealer had no idea that these vases were special pieces.

I could barely hold my composure when I asked the price. Two hundred and fifty dollars each was his response, and at this time, I didn’t know if it was a time to dance or cry.

Returning to my car carrying these two precious bundles ever so carefully, I placed them into the back seat. Then, I pinched myself to be sure that I wasn’t dreaming. You see, these wonderful 22" vases were worth over $5,000 each, even then.

I truly tell you, this isn’t a rare occurrence. I have had it happen many times since then. Lalique, Steuben and other art glass pieces with etched marks often present a huge problem in finding the marks. The secret is to recognize the quality of the materials and the decorations on the piece. If they both meet the standards of a quality piece, then you should spend the time required to verify the maker.

I want to challenge you to a test. At the next show you attend, find a Tiffany Lamp and ask to look at it. I believe that you will find that it isn’t easy to located the marks on the lamp because of their small size and because of where they are located under the shade.

The message here is to know quality first. Make a study the most sought after pottery, porcelain and art glass, and know the various artists whose work is in demand and commands the highest prices. Use every source you can. Search the Internet. See these pieces up close at shows. Invest in your own resource library. Used books can easily be found at reasonable prices through the internet. Take a look at our recommended reading list and choose your area to study at this time.

Keep your eyes open and don’t get in a hurry if you find something that tells you it has quality but the mark isn't immediately apparent. Be persistant in looking for the mark on pieces you recognize as high quality.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!"The Guy in the Red Tie" --- Daryle Lambert

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message.