Monday, December 31, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Italian Glass - Real Sleepers


Several years ago, my friend Henry in Los Angles told me to study up on Italian Glass, but I was to busy.

What a mistake that was! And looking at Maine Antique Digest this month really brought home to me what a huge mistake I had made.

Indianapolis, Indiana was the locale, back in September, for a sale of Italian Glass that was listed as the most important sale of its kind in this decade. About $700,000worth of glass was sold, and there were only 250 hand picked pieces represented. We are talking about big money here.

Henry has offered me several pieces of Italian Glass over the years, and to tell the truth, I was a little skeptical at the time. However I did venture out and purchase a couple of Lino Tagliapietra pieces. These were sold by my friends at the Cincinnati Art Gallery, and I did quite well with them. I wish that I had bought all of the pieces he offered, but I just didn't know enough then. You see, I need to continue my education as well as you. Learning is a lifelong process.

If this interests you, then call or write the Maine Antique Digest. I feel sure they will send you a free copy of the January paper. You may also be able to email them. The title of the article in the paper is “Fifteenth Anniversary Premier Italian Glass Auction." I would suggest that you mention me and 31 Club, and that we suggested that you contact them.

Here are some of the results of that sale: A Venini vase designed by Fulvio Bianconi, 14 inches high brought $25,300. This was only one of the many pieces that exceeded $10,000.

What really caught my eye was a figural candlestick by Venini and designed by the same artist as the vase I mentioned above. It is a double candelabra with a man sitting in the middle of the piece. This wasn't a very large piece, standing only 9 ½ inches but the price it achieve made it a giant. I have seen this piece at a garage sale or house sale in my travels, but didn't have the slightest idea that it had the value that was obtained at the auction: $18,400. You can bet I will be putting in some hours of study on Italian Glass in the future.

One thing to watch for are fakes. Remember, when anything becomes popular, the fake masters slither out from under their rocks. Also many of the makers didn't sign their pieces, so you must be able to identify them or know an expert that can.

The more I write on this story the more sick I am becoming. Yes, there were these other two pieces that I saw at a house sale and they had the from of a woman's head in clear glass with a cap upon them in colored glass. If I remember right, the asking price was a little over $1000 each, and in this Indianapolis sale two like them sold for over $14,000 each. Oh, well. Better luck for me next time. Some things we'll just have to learn together.

Take a look at some of this fine art glass and the realized prices here.

Learn more about Italian Glass here.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art according to a real wealth-building plan.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Sunday, December 30, 2007

Daryle Lambert: UHL Pottery & Rural Antiques & Collectibles


Having been away in Kentucky for Christmas, I have to admit that this has been a hard week for me to stay focus on business, but I have enjoyed seeing my mother, children, and grand children. Old friends shared stories that brought back memories that had been storied away for years and they seemed to come from everywhere. We laughed and cried but that was then and this is now so it’s back to the work we have set out to do together.

If I were to start an Antique business today in Kentucky, I would have to study different items than I would in Chicago. However, with the internet, this problem isn’t as important as it was when I first started in this business.

I have seen interesting items this week I don't normally see in Chicago. First to come to mind is UHL Pottery. This company started in Evansville, Indiana around 1846. The company later moved to Huntingburg, Indiana around 1908, though they kept their Evansville business office until 1934. Over the years, August Uhl was joined in business by his brother, Louis who stayed until 1879, and then his son, George. It remained a family business and closed around 1944 due to union strikes, rising costs and Japanese imports. From 1944-47, the company was leased to Vogue Pottery who continued to manufacture some UHL pieces until it closed in 1947.

Perhaps the most interesting things that you might run across in your search of UHL are pieces that were produced by members of the family and signed by the potter. They are usually pieces of dinnerware, such as cup and saucers and plates. But the pieces I always looked for were the Miniature Christmas Whiskey Jugs. These little jugs often have paper labels from the twenties and thirties and can sell for several hundred dollars each.

Today's Photo: Miniature Uhl Christmas Jug sold on ebay for $143.76 12/16/07

You might not believe this, but tobacco items are in demand today. Kentucky is still one of the biggest tobacco producing states in this country, so you would expect there to be interest for these tobacco related items.

Cigar boxes with their wonderful graphics can bring some fancy money today and so can cigarette lighters and ashtrays. These items gain additional value if they are also have advertising associated with them.

Even cigarette packs are being collected. Can you believe it? Paper matches are collected by a large group of collectors and there are even collector clubs that have been formed for the lighter and match collectors.

You might have thought that collecting wouldn't be as popular in rural communities as it is in the city, but this presumption would be wrong. There are collectors everywhere.

Toy farm implements can sell for thousands of dollars if the have the right name on them and are produced by the right companies. All the major implement companies have toys made of their products. You can find tractors, combines and plows, plus many other items that are eagerly sought after by the collector.

I once went into a garage here in Owensboro, and up in the rafters was a paddle car that looked as if it had been there for fifty years. I ask if it was for sale. I was told I could have it if I could get it down, which I did. After examining it, I told the woman I couldn’t take it for nothing, so I gave her $200. This little car later sold to a collector for over $2,200. Great things seem to show up in the strangest places.

Quilts, guns, knives and primitive furniture bring big money in rural areas. And there can be huge money in duck decoys. A fine Kentucky sugar chest can bring $25,000 plus today, and a painting by some of the better rural artist are beginning to sell to record heights today.

There seems to be something for everyone's taste today, and this gives us the excellent opportunity to cash in on this insatiable demand.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art according to a real wealth-building plan.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Saturday, December 29, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Why the Backlash to "Silver is a Sell?"


I'm back from Christmas in Kentucky, and upon my return, Cindy informed me that my recent story on selling your ungraded silver coins now, extracted right here from this blog, got more than 15 times the usual amount of hits. And the news distribution companies had people calling them upset that the story was run. I had to think about this, and in the process, asked myself why? Through this I learned a very important lesson.

When I write about buying items, most of you probably say, "That's nice." There are a lot of things to buy on the market. Then, you thank me for sharing some of the special ones with you. No one gets upset because I suggest things to buy. But when I suggested selling something, like I did the ungraded silver coin, I opened up a hornet's nest.

Aside from my dealing in antiques and fine arts, I have been in the investment business for over forty-five years now, and I have seen plenty of markets go up and down. But to those whose livlihood comes from promoting certain items, there is never a time for Joe Consumer to sell. One of my favorite sayings in the stock market is, "Bulls make money, Bears make money but Pigs go broke." This is also true in the Antique business as well.

As a youngster, I could have made a pretty penny if I had owned a mint Model A Ford. In fact, it might have brought $35,000 or more then. There are still those who are holding onto their Model A's, waiting for the time that they will bring $100,000. But if I had suggested they should sell their car at the lower price and use the funds for something else, I would have been threatened with my very life. And guess what? I can buy that same car today for less than $20,000.

Let's take it a step further. I have seen Royal Doulton stoneware decorated buy Hannah Barlow sell for $5,000 to $15,000. Today I could buy them for $2,000 to $5,000.

Speaking to you about the things to buy is very rewardingfor me, but perhaps the best service I will offer you is suggesting when it's time to sell.

I received many emails from people that were angry with me for writing that article and angry at the news distribution companies who posted it. There are also many people who make a lot of money when things go up, but if the prices turns down, the game is over for them. I'm talking silver here. Even if the price for silver goes a little higher, who cares? Now is the time to sell, because there is greater value to be found for your money now than presently keeping it in silver. I guess I've just said it again. This is just a industrial metal that has reached a level where it should be sold, and if some have a difference of opinion than me, so be it. I will never be angry with them for their views. When I find people who get so upset when their opinion is challenged, it is usually because they are trying to protect their own position, and it has nothing to do with helping others.

However, I will never shy away from sharing with you my opinions about the trends and on which side of them you I believe is wise to be on. In my humble opinion, this is the time to sell silver, and if some of the holders of this commodity metal get upset by my saying so, then it even makes me more sure that I'm on the right side of the trend. Well, I guess I've just gone and said to sell a third time now.

I sold my Royal Doulton collection at the top of the market, and I could buy the entire collection back today at twenty five cents on the dollar. The same with my porcelain dog collection and coin collection. Believe me, I don't miss them, and wouldn't even consider buying them back except perhaps the Doulton, because that market might have bottomed out, as I have written about before.

I can take the heat for you if it is the right thing to do, and selling ungraded silver coins now is the right thing to do.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Friday, December 28, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Is It Different? Somebody Probably Collects It.



If it's different, then someone usually wants to add it to their collection. Even if I don't. That's my rule about buying. Collections will reflect the collector's life.

No, I don't collect barbed wire, but someone else probably does. And it might reflect their love of the old west. Another person might like to collect cookie molds, and it bings back memories of time spent in the kitchen with their mother or grandmother. If you ever wondered if someone collects something, just check to see if there's a book or a website about it. There probably is.

To really become the treasure hunter that you want to be, you must be able to visualize and experience the emotions that others feel. Looking at a lady's compact must make your senses quicken as the thought of adding it to a collection crosses your mind. Yes, it might even take you back to the days of make believe when you dressed up in your mother's clothing and put on powder from one of her old compacts.

Finding a old Barlow knife in a box lot should make you tingle all over knowing that it will have great value for the person that sat endless hours with their father carving out a horse from a solid block of wood.

Collecting is like being in another dimension. And so in treasure hunting, you must be able to put yourself in this other dimension. It's like losing your sense of time and space like you do when you watch a movie. If you can put yourself in someone else's shoes and imagine stepping into their mind and heart, you could find all kinds of treasures that others collect. As a child, I can remember spending hours going through my baseball card collection, and with each one I would visualize a game that came back to my mind that involved the player that I was seeing on the card.

Pretty paintings on the wall or beautiful vases on the table can return a person back to fond memories even if your day is turned up side down. We all have this side to us where we want to dream and remember our past.

One time when I was at a home looking at items to possibly purchase, I came across something nestled among many boxes and old furniture in the garage. It looked like it might have been a soap box derby car, so I asked it I could uncover it. To my surprise, it was actually a miniature of an old race car with a gasoline engine.

They told me it was their son's, and he had raced it back in the 1950's. I had never seen anything like it before, so I knew I had to buy it for my son, Joshua. I asked the price and was told $500. That was too high for me, and I could tell they wanted it out of their garage, so I countered with $300 and they accepted. Now I had to get it home, so I borrowed a truck and stored it in my own garage. That was until my wife, Vicki kept asking me when it was leaving.

At this point, even if I had plans for Joshua and me to spend a great amount of time driving the car, it was time to find out what I had really purchased. It turned out to be a real quarter midget racer, and it was very collectible.

Making a few inquires I soon discovered that it was too valuable for Josh and me to bang around in. A man in Texas offered $2,500.00. When I told a friend of mine about the offer, he said he'd pay that, so I sold it to him. That was sure a lot easier than sending the car to Texas.

Buying something different can bring you the most unexpected rewards.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Thursday, December 27, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Noteworthy Watercolor Artist, Tom Barnes




As I move around from place to place and run upon what I consider noteworthy talent, I'll write about it. This way, even if it doesn't fit into our plans to make money today, you can keep it in your mind to watch for in the future. Some day, when others are saying, "I wish I had bought one of his paintings way back when," you won't be among them.

Tom Barnes, an artist from Chesapeake, Virginia is one of these noteworthy artists. He was the only other artist at Chicago's One Of A Kind Show that reached out and grabbed me, aside from the ones I've already written about in previous blogs.

Self-taught, Tom Barnes works primarily in watercolors. Immediately, you notice the intensity of his watercolors, and this sets him apart from most other watercolor artists. His landscapes capture the techniques of the Fauvists, stylized with mountains, hills, plains and lush foliage. Still life subject matter usually captures a moment of repose and reflection interrupted by something unknown. There is always a sense of a passing motion in his color renderings of figures and florals.

Over the past fifteen years, his works have found their way into collections in Mexico, Bolivia, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, England, Nigeria, and Spain as well as many east coast and mountain states’ cities.

Five years ago, Tom and his wife, Gail, traveled to Abuja, Nigeria for a two-month mission trip where they taught painting techniques and interior faux finishing to twenty-four Nigerian artists as they designed and painted some 36,000 square feet of sanctuary and day care walls. They continue to travel there to work with orphans through Tattercoats, Ltd. a nonprofit, tax-exempt foundation established in 1975 to promote arts and well-being of children around the globe. They recently began work with HLIA School for the Deaf Tegucigalpa Honduras. Please contact Tom for more information on this effort.

Keep a eye out for news on Tom Barnes and you may be well advised to add one of his paintings to your personal collection, after turning a extremely successful transaction. If you can't wait, Tom has prints of some of his paintings available on his gallery website.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Wednesday, December 26, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Antique Education is King in Turning $100 into a Personal Fortune



In my forty-five years in the antique business, I have had friends that have made life-changing discoveries because they had the knowledge required to identify valuable pieces. Luck usually plays no part in discovering a valuable piece, rather it is having had a strong knowledge base built up that will lead to the discovery of valuable items.

In my book, I spoke of a Frederich Morgan painting I found that I purchased for $16,000 and then sold for $115,000. I assure you, it was not luck that enabled me to find that painting, but hard work, knowledge and research. I think you will agree that the $99,000 profit I made was worth the effort. I also wrote about a man in Florida who restored paintings. When he purchased an old canvas for $25 to use as a practice canvas, he discovered that underneath the dirt and grime, he had a real jewel on his hands. He later sold it for $675,000. This was not luck. He had enough knowledge to recognize, that this canvas was an extremely valuable painting.

The longer I am in this business, the more certain I am that knowledge will trump any thing else you can do to be successful in the Antique and Collectible business. You can work yourself to the bone trying to search for treasures that you hear about people finding, but if you aren't educated to the rarer and more valuable paintings and other fantastic antiques out there, your chances of finding them are limited.

Going to sales and auctions or visiting antique shows by itself will not prepare you for the hunt. Yes, this helps, but you can't stop there. Once you have returned from one of these events, this is the time to hit the books and set to memory what you've seen and add it to your references. Remember, they say something has to be put in our mind seven times for it to be permanently lodged there.

Starting out with more common, less expensive items is the training ground, but when you stick with it and work the plan I wrote of in my book, in time you will find you have the ability to recognize, locate, and purchase the rare and desired items that are in high demand at a good price. Also an excellent profit can be made when you resell right away. Remember, we are not buying and holding.

I have offered to help you achieve your goals through the 31 Club. Members can call me, e-mail me and use some of the company resources I keep if you need information on an establishing a purchase price for a particular item, information on current values, negotiating with the seller, and finding the best venue to sell your item once you've purchased it. Members can call to find out about restoration, insuring items, caring for your antique items, and transporting items. Through our Associates Program, members can get assistance purchasing an item should they come across something very valuable but are not yet able to purchase it on their own.

Most Antique Dealers keep their knowledge to themselves. I don't believe you'll find many who are willing to share their insider secrets with others. But, I am. I am willing to share all I know with members of the 31 Club -- my 45 years in the business. It's like getting an entire education for $20. I don't know where else you can find that. If someone could show you how you can turn $100 into a million dollars or more without every borrowing a dime from a bank or anyone else, wouldn't you want to know how that's possible?

Why not join us today and learn to turbo charge your efforts while learning to build a personal fortune -- not on stocks and bonds, not on real estate -- but right here in the Antiques and Fine Arts Industry.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Tuesday, December 25, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Thanking All For This Wonderful Year


When I started on this journey just six months ago with Cindy, Chris, and Clarke, I had no idea where this adventure would lead us. The book was finished, but now what? Where was I going with this? It was in God's hands, and thankfully, he surrounded me with people of compassion, understanding and insight.

I had been a long time subscriber to the Antique Trader when I called up Eric Bradley and said, "help". I told him our story, and without hesitation he began to give me good advice. He even linked from our website and gave us an ad in the Antique Trader for that link when he knew that there would be very few visitors to our site at that time. What a great guy he is, and I am indebted to him .

Next came Emily Myers at AntiqueWeek and she said, yes, they would help us, too. I find these people genuinely have the best interest of all the Antique and Collectible dealers at heart. Emily never forgot to return my phone calls and I know that we will continue to work together for the betterment of this industry.

No way can I leave out Dale Flagg with the Maine Antique Digest. When I first called them and said my name was Daryle Lambert I heard “Daryle who?” I will never forget the help I got from this company from Sarah when we were launching the book back in May when I needed help the most.

And just the other day, I spoke with Phil Davies of News-Antique.com, one of our first and earliest supporters. We appeared on his news wire when I'm sure people were asking, “Who is Daryle Lambert, and what is this 31 Club all about?” But he stuck to his guns and never gave me the brush off no matter how many times I called. In fact he was always offering to help both me and Cindy whenever we asked. He's always willing to talk with us and has such insightful ideas.

I am amazed that Michael Hudson of Antiques-Collectibles-Auction-News.com would take an upstart like us and have the confidence to feature both Cindy and me as featured writers on his news site. He has listed so many of our articles there, and in doing so, has greatly help us grow. Michael is someone who has always been eager to share information and jump in there to help. Who can ask for better qualities than these in the people you're doing business with? The best way we can thank Michael is to produce a fantastic success story to justify his faith that we were worth the risk.

Bruce Rodgers of the Discover Mid-America helped greatly expose us when he published a full page story and Q&A section for us in their December issue. He has been a great mentor to me, and I don't know quite where we'd be without his help.

This is truly a wonderful business, especially when we are all in it together. I can assure you that if you aren't taking a look at all of these news resources, you are missing out. Where else can you find so much information on auctions and auction results, informative articles and indexes of up coming shows and events? I don't think you'll find better resources than these.

We thank all of our supporters, and especially our club members, who help make us better every day. Wishing you all a very Merry Christmas and a New Year of peace and prosperity.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Monday, December 24, 2007

Daryle Lambert: 31 Club Accomplishing Much Good Together


Will your stockings be filled with goodies this year? I certainly hope so. I hope you, like me, will feel that by joining the 31 Club, some of these goodies are sure to come your way.

Through the book and the club, I have met hundreds of fantastic people, and I know that it is just the beginning.

When I was first thinking of this book and club, I prayed that if this plan was truly to help other people, it would succeed beyond my wildest expectations. But if it was just of me, I prayed it would fail. I wasn't sure what the answer would be. But I no longer doubt. I have seen the blessings that have come from us cross paths, and I know those early prayers have been answered.

This year is coming to a close on a very high note for me. The book got published thanks to Cindy keeping me on task, and the 31 Club is adding new members each day. The national press is beginning to recognize what we hope to accomplish together, and our website ranking is advancing. We are becoming the community that I envisioned and prayed for.

I am so thankful for all of you that have asked for prayers, and to others, like Andrew, who have allowed us to enter their world. Your stories of beginning success have been inspiring to many and have given others the vision and courage to step out and join in this process of securing funds for our family's future while we share our lives. We are definitely in this together.

This holiday time is a time to rest a little, enjoy family and friends and be thankful to God for all his blessings. I will keep one eye open for those treasures, but my heart will really be filled with the satisfaction that we have accomplished much together. For that I to say thank you.

Be sure to check the in the Members Only section for my Top Ten Picks for this year, because after January 1st, I'll be posting a new list.

Enjoy the Season and let's make next year even better. --Daryle

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Sunday, December 23, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Where Beauty Began - Marblehead Pottery


I have outlined several different pottery companies for you to watch for throughout these blogs. I hope that you are beginning to see what an advantage having knowledge of multiple companies in your head is, as you are looking around. You are becoming the expert, and these will be your secrets to success.

Today we're adding Marblehead Pottery to our ever-growing knowledge base. This very simple small studio was started in 1904 to help teach ceramics to sanitarium patients but it became something entirely different. Arthur Baggs, founder of Marblehead, was a master potter at that time, and Marblehead produced some of the best Arts and Crafts pottery of the period. The factory was closed in 1936.

The carved Marblehead pieces are the most valuable, and many have as many as six colors included in the design. If you run across one that is heavily carved with five to six colors, the value may be well in the five figure range or more. The favorite colors are dark green, blue, light green, pink, yellow, brown, gray and orange. The more common the piece the less desirable it is, but just having the Marblehead mark on it means that it will bring several hundred dollars.

The subject matter for most of these pieces included simple nautical designs on matte pebbled backgrounds. Also used were many geomectic designs, and these are much in demand today, bringing very high dollars. Marblehead also made tiles, so watch for those as well.

Damage on Marblehead pottery pieces will be a real problem for collectors and might reduce the price as much as fifty percent. This is because Marblehead pottery was hard and durable, so you will find less damage to these pieces than most of the other pottery pieces.

When I first became interested in Marblehead Pottery, I found a small vase that I didn't think looked like anything special, so I offered under $100 for it. When the seller accepted my offer, I began to wonder if I had paid too much for this 4" tall vase with a few small carved flowers with three colors.

I put the vase up on eBay, hoping to make a few dollar. Then, the questions started to roll in. "Is there any damage?" and "Are you sure it's got three colors?" From the responses, I knew that this piece must be something special, but what were they willing to pay? After seven days I had my answer. It sold for $3,500.00. Today it would probably be even more.

Marblehead's main mark is a circle with a ship between an M on one side and a P on the other.

Today's Photo: Marblehead vase sold through Craftsman Auctions for $33,600 in 2006

Make sure your friends and loved ones have a copy of our book. You can sign them up for our 31 Club, and they'll get the book for free. Or order them the book, and get the membership for free. Either way, this makes a great Christmas gift for the special people in your life.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Saturday, December 22, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Beauty Shines in Our Youth - Caleb Noble Glass



You never know where the next surprise will surface, and this one surfaced at the One of a Kind Show at Chicago's Merchandise Mart.

When Cindy and I ventured out to the One of a Kind Show, it was mostly to see Doug Odom's outsider art exhibit. We weren't expecting to find much that would meet our criteria, because everything there was new, and of course, we primarily work with antiques. We were thrilled to run into glass artist, Charles Lotton, whose booth was kitty corner to Doug's, and a real surprise and treat for us. After visiting with Doug and Charles, we venture out and examined the more that 400 booths to see what was offered.

With a large rush of people moving between booths and down aisles, I suddenly realized Cindy had disappeared on me, so I back tracked a bit and found her mesmerized by a young 18-year-old glass artist as he worked on his new creation.

I stopped for a moment, to be courteous, and believe it or not, I couldn't get my eyes off of this young man as he worked that piece of glass. His name is Caleb Noble, and Cindy and I examined his case of dazzling glass jewelry pendants in awe. And not only is he talented, but his passion and enthusiasm for his work is so refreshing and a reminder to not give up on our youth today. There are ones out there that God has gifted and Caleb is definitely one of those.

Caleb spent some time with us and explained each step of his process. He doesn't use a kiln, but shapes and works his pieces by torch. These were some of the most outstanding glass works my eyes have had the pleasure to gaze upon in a long time.

Believe it or not, after looking at over 400 booths there were only two, other than Doug and Charles, that got my attention, The other one is a painter who I will write about in a later blog. You might think that by finding only two new artists at this show that I am rather choosy, but that's all right. Remember, we only want the best.

Today's Photos are of Caleb Noble and his glass jewelry pieces. I encourage you to take a look at some of his work, and I am certain that a little gift to yourself now might pay off big for you in the future. I'm willing to bet that anyone who wears one of his creations will have people asking about it.

You can see some of Caleb Noble's work here.

Club Member Update: I got a report on our club member, Andrew, and it breaks my heart to have to say it wasn't too good. His mother, Anne, asked us to continue to pray for him. Several of our members sent donations to the FD NOW fund, and Anne is extremely grateful to those who donated. For those who don't know Andrew, he is a young member of our 31 Club who is suffering from a very serious ailment, and If you would like to know more about him, please read my December 12th and October 15th Blogs.

Make sure your friends and loved ones have a copy of our book. You can sign them up for our 31 Club, and they'll get the book for free. Or order them the book, and get the membership for free. Either way, this makes a great Christmas gift for the special people in your life.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Friday, December 21, 2007

Daryle Lambert: On Merrimac Pottery



While we are studying pottery, why not look at the company that produced some of my favorite pieces. This company is Merrimac Pottery from Newburyport, Massachusetts.

This company founded in 1897 by Thomas Nickerson, burned to the ground in 1908. I truly believe that if this hadn't happened, Merrimac Pottery would be the best known of the Arts and Crafts Pottery in this country today. I personally like it much better than Grueby, and it is more rare than Grueby.

The pieces of Merrimac Pottery are often heavily carved, with thick walls, often finished with just the glaze. Their best pieces often depict underwater vegetation.

Some people say that Merrimac pieces are molded, but even if that is true, the work and design on their surface is hand tooled. In my opinion, they are the most natural of all this type of pottery.

I always like to have things that you can't find in most people's homes, and this is true of Merrimac. The true collectors out there would pay almost anything for the right piece of this wonderful pottery, but they may have to wait a long time just to have the opportunity to buy a common item made by Merrimac. I wish that I had a super piece in my collection. So, it anyone out there is wanting to sell your piece of Merrimac, please give me a call.

Today's Photo shows the Merrimac mark so you can add this to your memory bank or keep it on the paper you keep with you.

To see examples of this fine pottery, Rago Arts and Auction Center has some very fine examples of Merrimac Pottery. here.

Don't forget to make sure your friends and loved ones have a copy of our book. You can sign them up for our 31 Club, and they'll get the book for free. Or order them the book, and get the membership for free. Either way, this makes a great Christmas gift for the special people in your life.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Two For One - Outsider Artist Doug Odom and Charles Lotton




I find surprises come at the most unexpected times and places.

Cindy and I intended to meet outsider artist, Doug Odom and his wife at the "One of a Kind Show" at Chicago's Merchandise Mart at around 10:00am, and then spend the rest of the day at the show. The first bit of excitement came upon arriving and immediately finding an open parking space just one block from the mart. Since I don't like to spend money unnecessarily, especially $30 to park a car downtown, that was my first sign that a great day was in store for us.

When we entered this block-long building and made our way to the elevator bank, we discovered that Doug had already left passes for us, and we were whisked into the elevator by escort like a couple of VIP's. When the elevator opened up, we entered a space that occupied the entire eighth floor -- and as I said, this building takes up an entire city block. Artwork everywhere! We finally made our way to Doug's fantastic booth, we were greeted with hugs and began to admire his latest creations. And then the strangest thing happened. I gazed up and over my shoulder and couldn't believe my eyes. Right in the next booth stood none other than Charles Lotton and most of his staff. Now what are the chances of that in a place this size, with over 400 artists?

Charles' and Doug's booths were kitty corner to one another and both had already admired one another's work and were in negotiation to buy or trade a piece of their work for the other's. Both booths were filled with people for the whole time we were there. Charles had Jackie and Brenna working his booth, and I can guarantee you that I would hire those two to sell for me any day.

After spending quite a long time with Doug and Charles, we toured the rest of the show, but I found only two booths that held any interest for me. One was a painter you will hear about, and the other was a fantastic young glass artist who I will be blogging about to introduce to you. Only four out of over four hundred dealers caught my attention, Like I've said before, we look for only the best.

If you haven't had a chance to see Doug Odom's work, we've got two pieces available in our 31 Gallery. Be sure to take a look at them here.

Don't forget to make sure your friends and loved ones have a copy of our book. You can sign them up for our 31 Club, and they'll get the book for free. Or order them the book, and get the membership for free. Either way, this makes a great Christmas gift for the special people in your life.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Daryle Lambert: An Auction Provides the Testing Ground to Check Ourselves


We have studied many different types of Pottery, Porcelain, Paintings and Glass over the last few months through this blog, and our library of knowledge has increased substantially, but how are we doing?

That's the question I asked myself as I attended the auction at Direct Auction in Chicago yesterday, along with Cindy and our club member, Andre. There were many things that caught my eye before the sale started, and I previewed the pieces I might sell at prices that would meet my rules for purchase. The three of us were also interested to see what the coins would be selling for, and this was Andre's first auction at Direct Auction.

During the preview, I checked to be sure the items were what I thought they were, and then I continued to check them for any damage or flaws that might not be apparent at first glance. Mentally, I tried to recall similar items I had seen sell before, so I could set the upper range of my future bid. I also scouted out my competition to see how much interest there seemed to be in the pieces I hoped to be bidding on.

Yes, I had prepared myself as the start of the auction was coming near. Taking my seat next to Cindy and Andre, I felt the excitement starting to build. The crowd at this auction was one of the largest I've seen them attract in many months, so my expectations did diminish a bit because of that.

Coins were the first items offered, and I had checked the price of gold and silver before I arrived. If I could purchase half dollars, quarters and dimes that were minted before 1965, I decided I could pay up to five or six times their face value, not even consider their numismatic value, while still meeting my criteria. This auction had more coins than usual. There were literally hundreds of each type.. As the auctioneer began the sale, fifty or sixty coins would be lumped into a group and they were priced per coin. I found myself shaking my head in amazement at some of the prices these coins were going for. After all the coins had been sold, including the gold ones, I still hadn't made my first purchase. I have to admit, I was a little disappointed.

I figured my time would come when we moved on to the pottery, glass and porcelain. Finally, the Charles Lotton magnum paperweight was coming up, and I didn't feel there was much interest for it at this auction. Earlier, I had spoken to Warner Smith, the president of the Lotton Glass Club, and we agreed that if I could buy it for $250, I should do well. But, that paperweight was hammered at $400. No money to be made there. Next was some Doulton dogs. These used to be my specialty, so I thought I had the inside track on them. I think there were six, and since they were rather common, I figured that $50 each should buy them easily. When they sold for about $600, I could tell this wasn't going to be a very promising evening.

Now was the time to go to the counter and get some hot dogs for us and think about what was happening here. I asked myself whether or not this night could improve. It didn't. In fact, we didn't even stay for the art, because through my friends, I learned that bids were left on the paintings I was interested in. And those bids were greater than I would be willing to pay. A left bid is when someone previews the auction and then leaves an absentee bid on certain items.

Being totally discouraged, we decided to leave, but not before picking up our Christmas presents from the auction house -- a can of peanuts and a box of turtles.

By now you are probably asking what's the purpose of this blog? My answer goes back to the very heart of what I'd like you to have etched in your mind. In the first chapters of my book, I state that one of the most important things I would repeat over and over to you would be the necessity of having patience. Patience will be the key to your success using the wealth building plan in my book, and that patience combined with knowledge, will give you everything in life that you desire.

Yesterday I followed my own rule. I saw each one of those pieces slip from my hands at prices I knew I wouldn't be able to at least double. I had to use all the patience I could muster up not to give in and overpay for an item. But you know what? I still have my money, and there will be another day. While most of the people at the auction will make a very small gain on their investment, if any, I still have my money to buy a treasure that is waiting for me right around the next corner. At the price I want.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Daryle Lambert: University City - Brouwer - F.M. Robertson - Grand Feu - Rhead - Valentien - UNKNOWN TO MANY


Do you recognize these names in pottery? If you don't, I hope my encouragement will persuade you to do a little research. You see, there is gold in those names.

I promised if you would stay with me, I would tell you where the real money is, and in these names, you can find a lot of it. Here is a suggestion. Go to the Kovels New Dictionary of Marks and copy all the marks for each one of these companies on a piece of paper and carry it with you at all times. Even better, buy the book and keep it close at hand.

You will find that several of these artists worked for more than one company, but when they worked for these companies, they produced some of their most collectible works. These companies have pieces selling on the low side for better pieces at $5,000, but the sky is the limit on exceptional pieces and their prices might range 10-20-50 thousand and these might even be too low.

Why don't most dealers spend their time researching for these real treasures. The answer might be that they don't come along every day, and if you are paying your mortgage with the sale of your daily finds these pieces may be too scarce to rely upon. But, the great advantage you have by following the 31 Club plan, is that it's okay to take up to six months to find that one special piece that will keep you on track to your million dollar account. Remember, we're making planned buys, using a strategic plan.

While University City Pottery had a short life span from 1901-1911 or perhaps 1914, its founder, Edward G. Lewis managed to attract some of the best in the industry including Frederick Rhead, Adelaide Robineau, and Serves- artist Taxile Doat.

In 1894, Theophilus A. Brouwer started Brower Pottery. It was a one man operation, and closed its doors in 1946, fourteen years after his death. There is a limited amount of his work that has survived and it is very valuable.


F. M. Robertson Pottery started in 1934 when Fred Robertson and his son, George, opened this company together. It was located in Los Angles California at a time when many of the better potters were moving west.

Grand Feu was another California pottery that had a short life span from 1912 to around 1916.

Frederick Rhead is one of the better known pottery artist of his day and I would suggest that you Google him for more information. If you recall from my earlier blog this week, Rhead was the leading artist for Roseville's extremely valuable line, Della Robbia, and he worked with many other pottery companies.

If you'll google Valentien, you'll discover his history and pottery and have his name and mark in your mind as well.

These pieces of valuable pottery could be right under your competition's nose and they wouldn't even know it. So my suggestion to you again is to READ - READ – READ.

Naturally, this reminds me of a story. Many of you know that I was in the oil business at one time, and as the story goes, there was a city slicker driving down a dirt road When he saw a farmer sitting on his porch rocking in a rocking chair. As he approached the old gentleman, he saw a oil pump in the field, and the farmer was rocking with every stroke of the pump. The city slicker couldn't resist asking the farmer what he was doing. The farmer told him, "I'm counting my money." The city slicker asked, "How's that?"

"Every time the pump goes up and down, I say one dollar, two dollars , three dollars. That's my part of the oil."

The reason I tell you this story is that every time you read about something in the Antique or Collectible field, you are just like that old farmer counting your money.

Today's Photo shows a piece of University City Pottery.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Monday, December 17, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Beautiful Blue Holland Pottery - DELFT



Holland is known for many things besides windmills and wooden shoes. Perhaps the most beautiful thing the Dutch are known for is their Blue and White Delft Pottery. I'm sure you have seen it and admired the intricate work involved in the many pieces they have produced since 1673. Delftware was originally developed at this time as an imitation of Chinese Porcelain.

If you ever find an early piece of Delft, be sure to have it authenticated by one of the leading auction houses. I am certain they will be glad to do that for you at no expense. Why? If it is an early and rare piece, it can command a four or five figure price with no trouble, and they'll want to sell it for you.

This is one of those items that most of us will need to research thoroughly, because information isn't as easy to obtain on Delft as it is on most items. One great source, however, is Kovels New Dictionary of Marks, by Ralph and Terry Kovel. There is a chart of the Delft marks by year in the back of the book. These marks begin at the year 1879. Later pieces aren't that difficult to date, but earlier ones will require a Delft expert.

This pottery is a tin glazed pottery, and the standard mark is a pottery vase design with the word "Delft" below it, and often "Holland. There are many fakes and reproductions out there, so be on guard. In fact I have been fooled myself, but thankfully, I always wait until I am absolutely positive I know what I have before purchasing Delft. Most of the pieces you will find today were produced after 1891, but even they can go for a handsome penny.

This pottery, known as Dutch Pottery, was also made in other countries such as England, where it was produced in the eighteenth century. I don't think that the price will differ from country because it is always the quality that counts.

Because there is so much new Delft being produced today, I have found that most dealers just presume it to have very little value, so if you're careful theremay be some great bargains just waiting to be found. I don't believe you'll find many garage sellers that can identify an old piece of Delft from the new.

I wish that I had some fabulous story to tell about Delft, but I don't. I am looking for that first great piece to come my way. I never put it out of my mind because it could be at that next stop. If any of you find a great price before I do, would you please share that news with us?

If you have been with us for a while, you will remember that I said that being in this business is as simple as remembering one thing, then another, until there are hundreds of items in your memory when you go out hunting. Read, read, read and then read some more. That will be the secret to your success. I'm hoping these blogs will provide you with a starting point in many fields that you will expand upon. One day I might be asking you for some answers.

Today's Photo is courtesy of Southern Accents, who ran a nice article on Delft.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Sunday, December 16, 2007

DARYLE LAMBERT - LOOK FOR THE STORK ON ROZENBURG


We have studied several of the potteries that were produced in this country but how about ones over seas. I would like to start with the one that has been very profitable for me, The Rozenburg Royal Delftware pottery.

I knew nothing about this pottery until I found a plaque at a garage sale and purchased it for just a few dollars. Getting home and studying my price guides I decided to put it up for sale on eBay. I figured that I didn't know to much about this factory and eBay gave me the best exposure in the European markets.

This was a wonderful piece was a country scene of a Shepherd with his dog leading the flock down a country road. There was also a barn in the picture and the colors were wonderful. The primary color was mauve with some tints of blue and a white sky. It was mounted in a wooden from and when I saw it there was no other decision to be made I had to own it.

As the auction progressed I couldn't believe my eyes as the price soon pasted $1000. The next day when I went to my computer I could hardly keep my composure, there, right there it said $1500 for a purchase that I had made for under $20. The final price came to almost $2000 and you betcha that got my attention.

But what was so special about this piece? Later I found out that the artist at the Rozenburg factory were some of the best in all of Europe. This company started in 1883 and closed in 1917. It never seemed to be able to become profitable even when it changed to composition of it production lines many times.

In 1900 something good finally happened to the Rozenburg factory when the director, Jurriaan Kok launched a new line called eggshell porcelain. This was done at the 1900 Worlds Exhibition in Paris. This new porcelain was and immediate hit and the factory for several year became extremely profitable. But only for a few years and then it was back to its losing ways.

This new porcelain was so thin that it was almost unusable but the people loved it. The colors were vivid and interesting on all the pieces that were produced and this was a big change from the earlier works that were rather muted.. Pieces included vases, mantel clocks, dishes and jugs and today they are much in demand.

To give you an idea a cup and sauce in the eggshell should bring you at lest $1000 if it is one of the better patterns. You must be asking where can I find one? At your local garage sales would be my answer because very few with the exception of you would know what they were looking at.. You see never go out shopping with out looking at the bottom of each cup and sauce that is displayed, but how would I know it then? Rozenburg has a very distinctive mark, it is a Stork standing on one leg. I have never run into any fakes up to the point but I am not saying there won't be in the future.

I would like to share just one more little story with you about Rozenburg. This was when Warner and I were partners and I was scanning the Antique trader and my eyes notice this tile that was enormous. I think it was almost 3 feet by 3 feet. It liked like Rozenburg but the ad didn't say it was. I call and sure enough it was Rozenburg. My memory may be a like off after these years but I bid from my phone on this piece that was being auctioned off in Florida. If my memory is correct I think that I bought it for $1500 and Warner sold it to a man in Canada that drove to Chicago to pick it up for $5000, not a bad days woks.

Watch for that Stork it can put money in your bank account.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Saturday, December 15, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Know the Rare Ware in Roseville



Roseville pottery is perhaps the best known of all the pottery companies in America. Every dealer is aware of the common patterns of this very decorative pottery, and even most of the more rare patterns. With the production of even their common designs being reproduced today, Roseville prices are on the skids. In fact, I seldom even pick up a piece of Roseville anymore because people that own it still think that all the production at the Roseville pottery is still in demand, and so their prices to sell are too high for me to make a profit on it.

One exception in Roseville, however, is called Della Robbia. Now we're talking. If you come across a piece of this pottery produced by Roseville, you have something really special. This line began in 1906 and the designer was the world famous Frederick Hurten Rhead. They introduced seventy-two versions that year alone. Several years later, they brought out a new line of Della Robbia, but it was far inferior to the early pieces.

When you see a piece of Della Robbia, what really catches your eye is that it is deeply carved, sometimes as much as one eight of and inch deep, and then it's finished in a polychrome enameling. These pieces are eye dazzlers.

Rhead worked for some of the best pottery companies in this country before going to Roseville. The first company that employed him when he immigrated to this county was the Avon Company, where he worked from 1902-1904. Then he worked with another well known company that you have heard me talk about -- The Weller Company, before he moved on to Roseville.

His love of pottery seemed to keep him on the move, finally ending up in California with the Arequipa Company. He also had a brief stay with Jervis on his way out west.

I have to admit that I don't have any great stories of finding a wonderful piece by Frederick Rhead, but I am still looking. I know that there is one out there that has my name on it. These can be the real sleepers. Yes, if you find one, the price might be rather expensive, but when you get to the place in the 31 Steps to Your Millions where you need high-end items to take you to the next step, I suggest you look for Frederick Rhead pieces. The sky is the limit for his better examples, and this is where some real money can be made for you. What would you think if I said $50,000 may be too little for the right piece.

If you should come across a piece of Frederick Rhead before the time comes when you can afford to buy it, don't hesitate to call or e-mail us for assistance through our Associate Program.

As you can see, all Roseville isn't alike. Even the common pieces have different price ranges. You can study which patterns and colors bring in the highest prices. By knowing these differences, you will have trained your mind and your eye to spot a real treasure.

Today's Photo is a Roseville Della Robbia vase that sold for $38,850 and set a world record at the Pottery Lovers Auction in 1999.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Friday, December 14, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Rookwood Tile was Sailing


We will continue yesterday's discussion of Art Tiles by looking at another great company - Rookwood.

Since I lived most of my life in Qwensboro, Kentucky, I was very unfamiliar with Cincinnati, the home of Rookwood. But the Bengals and Reds were there, and they were the closest pro teams from my home in Kentucky, so as I got older, Cincinnati became more familiar. I became acquainted with Rookwood very early. Rookwood was the first potteries that I became interested in to the extent of wanting to create a collection of their work for myself. In fact, did you know that if you visit Cincinnati, you can eat right in the kilns of the Rookwood factory?

Rookwood is known for its lovely vases, produced by many of the greatest pottery artists this country has ever known. At past World's Fairs, Rookwood designed pieces large enough for a grown man to climb into. But aside from wonderful pottery, Rookwood make great tiles and plaques, too.

Some of the outstanding artists that worked at the Rookwood factories over the years were Matthew Daily, Maria Nichols, Sara Sax, Kataro Shirayamadani and Artus Vanbriggle. This is just a short list from the many artist that passed through the doors of the wonderful company in Cincinnati Ohio.

This company posted its first catalog, which included tiles in 1907. These pieces were from 2 by 3 inches to 12 by 18 inches in size. Most were architectural tiles at that time, but later many of their artist also produced fantastic plaques.

The tiles were called faience while the plaques were named vellum. Today, I combine them when talking about pieces that are usually put in frames and hung on the wall. The tiles are usually carved and look like something that would be around the doorway or hearth. The plaques, on the other hand, look like paintings with scenes of landscapes or other scenes.

I once attended a house sale, and one of the dealers showed me a plaque he had just bought for $100. I looked at it and realized that it was a vellum Rookwood so I offered him $4000 on the spot. He told me that he had already sold it and wouldn't tell how much he got for it. I don't think he received anywhere near the $4000 that I offered. Later, I saw it come up for auction and I think it hit about $7000. Don't be afraid to make an offer to another dealer if you see something that would meet our goal of doubling the purchase price. This wouldn't have been a double, but I think you would agree it was close enough.

I once attended one of Cincinnati Pottery Auctions, where I had several pieces consigned. There was a wonderful larger plaque that I thought might look good on my wall so I circled it in the catalog. When its number came up, I started to get excited, but that didn't last long. The auctioneer yelled out, "Do I hear $5,000, yes, how about $10,000, how about $20,000, yes I have $50,000, thank you I have $75,000, let's make it an even $100,000," and it stopped there around $97,500. This plaque was of a steamship going out to sea. It showed the water breaks as it was leaving. If you ever see a Rookwood tile with a ship, buy it as fast as you can if the price is right.

“Rookwood Pottery- the Glazed Lines," by Anita Ellis is a great book I'd recommend taking a look at.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Daryle Lambert: Don't Walk on Those Tiles. Especially If They're Grueby.




How often have you seen a tile and thought, I don't need to look at that? In your haste to look at something more interesting, you may have just passed a real treasure. Most of the better potteries made tiles to hang on the wall or place around the fireplace. The complex quality these tiles have make them of great value in the market place.

Grueby started in the tile manufacturing business in 1894 when William Grueby began to make tile under the name of Grueby Faience Company. These tiles were enameled architectural faience pieces, and they immediately became popular. They came in many forms, with carved mermaids, ships and flowers being some of the favorite subjects chosen by the artist. Some of these tiles may well bring $10,000 plus in today's market. I have been fortunate enough to find several of the Grueby tiles in the past, but nothing that was very special or rare. For the most part, I have had the little cupid tile, but even these they may bring $500 each. That isn't bad if they were purchased for $5.00.

The closest I have ever been to making a killing in tile was when I attended the Music City Show in Nashville. Cecil and I decide to run an ad in the local paper, and we got a call of interest to us, so off we went. What a disappointment this visit was until I eyed the fireplace. My eyes almost popped out of my head. There before me was a fireplace completely made of Grueby tile, and some pieces I hadn't ever seen before.

I began to ask questions very cautiously so not to give my hand away. After some time, I knew that no one had ever approached them about buying the whole fireplace, so I ask them if it was for sale. Their answer was "at the right price."

What a predicament I was in, wanting to be fair but not scaring them at the same time. I finally said I would pay them $25,000 for it and waited patiently for their answer. “What will we do with that large hole in our living room wall?” the woman asked me. I scratched my head and did some calculating, finally offering to fix it if it wouldn't cost more than $5,000. There, for a minute, I thought that it was mine. But it wasn't to be. They said I would hear from them, but it never happened. To this day, I don't really know what the value of all the tile would have been, but when I put the total to them, it could have possibly come to over $100,000. You see there were over two hundred tiles and half were the very decorative ones.

Most of you might have been aware of the Grueby pottery in the form of vases and bowls, but how any of you knew that there was gold in them thar tiles? Often you will find tiles lying in groups, and most people just pass them by. I'm sure you won't pass them by from now on. I have lost the name of their company but if you want to know anything about tile call Wendy and Sandy at 978-649-4983. There are also many wonderful books on Art Tiles that you can search out as well.

I was going to include Rookwood tile in this blog, but I think I will keep that for tomorrow.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start building personal wealth buying and selling antiques & collectibles. Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

DARYLE LAMBERT - TIS THE SEASON


I am sitting here looking out my window and enjoying God's new cover for the earth. Some may say that snow is a bother, but to me it is beautiful, pure and a sign of things to come.

I now can feel the Christmas Spirit once the ground is blanketed with a deep cover of snow. My mind can wander to times past spent with my family. Dad would always receive fruit baskets and packages of nuts, and on days like this, I can see visions of him laughing as he built the fire in the fireplace. Yes, I miss you Dad, but these memories make the time that we are separated worth the wait.

I am looking forward to the trip to Kentucky in a couple of weeks where time will be spent with parents, brothers and sisters, cousins, aunts and uncles and grandchildren. I hope that I will be able to keep my perspectives in order and realize that the true blessings will be the time we share together, not the presents.

My thoughts seem to keep taking me back to Andrew Slaw, the fifteen year old boy that has it so right. Living in the moment and finding joy in it is Andrew's path through life.

I have written about my meeting with this wonderful young man on several occasions, but today I want to bring you a message of hope that has been shared with me by Andrews Mom, Ann.

Ann tells me that Andrew isn't doing that great right now, and asked if we would keep him in our prayers. Andrew is one of our members, and his mother told me that he has completed our book and said to her, "I wish I could get everyone to do what's in here."

Andrews parents have started a foundation called FD NOW which is a group to help find a cure for the disease that Andrew suffers from. At this time, there isn't a cure for FD, but the research that is being done looks very promising. I am including a facts sheet on the blog and also a link where people can make donations to this cause.

If you go to the FD NOW site, you can find more information about the disease Andrew is afflicted with. Would you be willing to donate to help advance the search for a cure? Click here to help.

I am wishing Andrew and his family a Very Merry Christmas, and I extend this in the name of all our 31 Club Members.

Discover how our book can be the tool that helps you become financially free simply buying and selling antiques, collectibles and fine art.

Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about The Million Dollar Challenge.

If you haven't yet had a chance to see what we've got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We've got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you'd like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your item to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Contact us here.

If you wish to leave comments use the ANONYMOUS button and then you don't have to sign in to leave your message. Chime in and participate with us.