Saturday, October 31, 2009

Patty Thum – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – Vickie's Favorite Artist.


Patty Thum - My Wife Vickie's Favorite


I am going to make this blog rather short because I will be leaving for Jeffersonville Indiana at 3:00 in the morning. There is an exhibit of Patty Thum's paintings and drawings at the Ohio River town's Howard Steamboat Museum starting tomorrow. I have two entries that will appear in the catalog and if I must say so myself they may be the two best in the exhibit.

I have only had the opportunity to purchase four of the Patty Thum's paintings and only missed one. I did sell one painting to a friend of mine that lives in Owensboro Kentucky and ever since I did it I have had second thoughts. It seems that most people that own Patty's paintings hold on to them however the Antique Trader stated that there were many more of her works to be found. If you hear of any for sell I am a buyer. To see more information on this exhibit you can go to the Antique Trader website for October the 16th and there you will find the article on Patty Thum that covers several pages.

Why am I going to the exhibit you must be asking? I have told my readers that the best way to find what your looking for is to be around people that have knowledge about the items you seek or in some cases even own items that you are looking for. In this case the people attending this exhibit have interest in Kentucky artist like myself so I want to spread my name around, plus my paintings being in the catalog ot the exhibit can only increase my paintings value. Exposing the items that you wish to sell will always help you when that time comes for you to sell those items.

Here is Patty Thum's biography:


Patty Prather Thum was born October 1, 1853 in Louisville, Kentucky daughter of Dr. Mandeville and Louisiana (Miller) Thum. Patty received her first drawing lessons from her mother while still a child. She studied art at Vassar College under Henry VanIngen, the New York Art Students League with William Merritt Chase, Henry Mowbray, and Lemuel Wiles. Thum returned to Louisville in 1870 where she maintained a studio for 35 years. Primarily known as a painter of flowers and Kentucky landscapes, Thum acquired her love for nature from periodic visits to her grandparents' rural home. The subject of this painting, taken after a photograph by Oldham County's Kate Matthews, is Mary Johnston stepdaughter of author Annie Fellows Johnston. Thum also executed portraiture and magazine illustration, taught lessons, and was an art critic for Louisville Herald for many years. Thum received an honorable mention for book illustration at Chicago's 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. She also exhibited at the 1898 New York State Fair and the St. Louis Exposition of 1904. Patty Thum died September 28, 1926 in Louisville at age 72.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Which Paintings? – Daryle Lambert's Antiques and Collectibles Blog – That's the Question.


William You Where Right [ Charles Curran } - Thanks to Askart.com



I would like to talk about a wonderful opportunity that will happen to you in the future. That opportunity will be when there are more items offered to you than you might want to purchase at a particular time. What do you decide at that those moments and what is the correct decision?

The best way for me to address this problem with you is to share what is going on in my life right now. As you know I have been fortunate enough to move several paintings and other items, such as the sculptures that I sold, but I am still carrying a huge inventory. So how actively should I be pursuing new purchases? That is the question. Often this is answered by the amount of cash that you have on hand but let's assume that isn't a problem in this case.

Over the last several days, I have been presented the chance to buy some extra special paintings, but making the decision to purchase these when I am already choking on the inventory I have should take an extra measure of study before doing it. First let's examine the German painting that I have written about that didn't sell at auction and I believe that there is money to be made with it. So what did I do? First, I had to decide at what price I simply couldn't pass it by. Once this was established, I called the auction house to see if it was for sale after the auction and at what price. The price was just a little more than that magic number where I would throw all caution to the wind and buy it at that moment. But no, I made a counter offer at the price that I felt comfortable with. I have not been given the final answer yet but I do believe it will be positive when the auction house contacts the seller.

At the same time that I was considering the first purchase, I was offered two very large paintings by a New York artist for $22,500. Searching AskART, I found that the last painting by this artist sold at a very well known auction house for over $20,000. Making this story even better, the painting that sold was only 1/2 the size of the ones being offered to me. The subject matter is comparable and the quality is equal. Now you are in a quandary on what to do, right? Well again, what is that magic number where you will have to own them if the seller agrees? The less expensive purchase should have very little effect on your moving forward with your plan for the "Million Dollar Race" but the expensive paintings could put a hold on your progress for a while if you make a mistake. Again, you are at that moment of decision. What to do? If the larger purchase will be over 25% of the capital you're working with, it may be time to partner with the “Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Clubs” Associates program on the paintings or get an outside partner to go in with you on them.

I have been offered two other pieces but I believe that my message to you has been made clear. First, if you already have inventory, be sure that it is wise to expand it now. Second, never commit more than 25% of your working capital to any one item, but if you find that expensive treasure that you must have, spread the risk with others. The more of your working funds that you have committed, the cheaper your price should be for any offers you are making on additional pieces. If you follow these rules you will have a very long and successful career in Antiques and Fine Art.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Friday, October 30, 2009

Helpful Hints – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – Right time of year.


Sometimes it's best to be the Turtle - Thanks to Aktkinsdietbulletinboard.com


I have tried to give my readers an advantage over most others in these very difficult markets. One way that I can accomplish this is to share with you how auctions that are going on in the next two months can be your friends. But you have told me that it is very difficult to make money buying at auctions unless there is an item that most dealers don't know the value of, right? That is partially right but there can be exceptions if you are patient.

Here is what I mean. First, preview the catalogs of the better auction houses and list the items that you would like to buy if the price were right. Knowing that at the low estimate it would still be out of our range, we wait until the auction is over to see if there are any items on our list that didn't sell. If there are, we take action. I have seen auction house reduce the price on a particular painting 75% in the after market, which means it didn't sell at the auction.

So after the auction is completed, get the results as quickly as possible to see if any of the items on your list didn't sell. Presto, if there are any, you call and ask if there is an after market price for those pieces. In fact I will be calling Shannon's auction tomorrow on their sale yesterday because there was a painting I was interested in.

I know that you are asking if this can work so I am going to give you a few of my own experiences. First the Harvey Joiner portrait that didn't sell at auction in September of 2007 was listed for $500-$800. I knew there was a possibility that if I could purchase it in the after market I could make money, and possibly a lot of money. Calling the auction house, I asked if the painting was still for sale and was told "yes for $240", if my memory is correct. There was no doubt in my mind that I was going to be the new owner of that painting. Later I attempted to sell it for $5000 but was unable to get that price so I had to settle for a mere $3500. I know what you're saying, “I feel so sorry for you.”

How about the large charger that I bought for $1000 after the auction when it didn't sell. The low estimate was $2500 but I wasn't willing to pay that so by waiting, I purchased it for what I thought was a fairer price for me. It soon found a new home for $5000 and I believe the buyer thought he was getting a bargain. I could continue to tell these stories but I think you get the idea. There are even some auctions that email out a list after their auctions with the list of unsold items and the new price. Guess what? I have called some of these houses and offered even less than their new price and been able to purchase at my offering price.

There is also another wrinkle to this way of buying and I demonstrated that to you a few weeks ago. Remember when I waited until the house sale was over and then purchased three sculptures and was given several other items by the owner free. Yes, these sculptures were sold in a matter of days and I was able to give the buyer three treasures that someday will be worth many many times more than they paid for them but I was also happy. Reading my book, you find out that there is no reason to get in a hurry when buying if you have the money. My most important rule is to spend my money wisely. If I wait and make a trade where I make $5000 to $10,000 on one deal, how many little $100 to $200 trades do I have to make to equal that one? Here is what might be a little difficult to understand until it happens to you a few times. Selling cheap items is more difficult than selling expensive ones. People with money just don't have to bargain as much as us common folks if they find something they desire .

Isn't this easy? I ask myself almost every day why everyone isn't doing it, but I am sure glad they're not.

I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Thursday, October 29, 2009

David Smallhouse and Richard Satava – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – The Future.


David Smallhouse



I have been around art glass for over 45 years and yes, the old standards such as Tiffany, Steuben, Lalique, Daum Nancy and Galle will always be in fashion, but there may be some new sheriffs on the block. Names like Smallhouse and Satava may be just the ticket for the under 40 crowd. You may want to ask way this might be and in my opinion it could be because the young folks don't want what their parents had but something new for themselves.

The two up and comers in my eyes are David Smallhouse and Richard Satava. To get a real idea of their works you should go to the Cincinnati Art Gallery's site and look at the rather large assortment of their glass being sold on Sunday November the 7th. Smallhouse has some of the most realistic animal pieces fearturing frogs and octopuses that you will ever find. I will guarantee you that I will eventually own one of Smallhouse's covered jars with the octopus.

Not to be outdone, Richard Satava produces large paperweights that contain jellyfish that look as if they had just been plucked out of the ocean. My favorite is the side swimmer and I also hope to own one of these someday.

Both of these gentlemen are masters of their craft and, along with the animal pieces, they both produce a wide range of vases that have colors that are almost indescribable. Their vivid reds, blues and greens have an iridescence that only a master could produce. If I were invited to a home that features the art glass from these two studios, I would be more than impressed. In fact I may have to be totally honest and say I prefer them to the old standards.

You may remember that I wrote a little about these artists in a past blog when Warner Smith, one of my best friends, started a new club. It can be found at www.glassclubs.com. You bet he would be more than glad to hear from you and even sell you a piece or two of his Smallhouse and Satava glass. Don't get caught in the mind set that if it isn't old there can't be much value there. Once you see works by these two gentlemen you will be as hooked as I am.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Rookwood – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog - Are you sure?


Matthew Daly Rookwood Artist


I have continued my love of Rookwood pottery, Tiffany Glass and Galle Art Glass for many years. Most of that time has been spent accumulating knowledge of the products of companies like these. In my career as an antique and fine art dealer, I thought that time spent on quality and rarity would be the best use of my time.

To my surprise, however, there was much more to learn about these companies and their products than I ever imagined. Let's take Tiffany for example. I didn't know that this company made furniture and pottery as well as the items that everyone recognizes as Tiffany. Here is another loop in the circle. Louis Comfort Tiffany was also a painter and on occasion you may find a work by him. Always be on watch for the Tiffany name but also for his logo, LCT. The Tiffany company will always be known for the beautiful glass they produced but paintings, metal works and pottery will always bring a pretty penny if they bear the Tiffany name.

Would you be amazed to find out that Galle, one of my favorite companies, made furniture and pottery? Most people would not. This is the reason that I encourage my readers to examine anything they come across before discarding it as a worthless item.

There is another way that by following my suggestion you may increase your bank account. True artists may have worked for several companies during their careers. For example many of the Rookwood artists served tenures with as many as five different companies. You may run across a pottery vase that has a mark other than Rookwood on it but the name of one of Rookwood's artists. Many dealers wouldn't pick up on that but if you do it is like money in the bank. Here are just a few of the Rookwood artists that worked for other potteries: Artus Van Briggle, Matthew Daly, E.T. Hurley and Albert Valentien.

Now for the reason I am writing this blog. Rookwood, as far as I know, didn't produce anything other than pottery but their artists did. For example, many of the artists at Rookwood also painted and their paintings can bring in a fair amount of money. To see what I mean, there is a painting by one of the leading artists at Rookwood, Matthew Daly, in the Cincinnati sale and I will be bidding on it. You see, even though it is totally different from his pottery pieces, I am interested because it is a cowboy scene and would look great on my wall until someone made me an offer that I couldn't resist.

If you would like to see other pieces in this auction go to Cincinnati Art Galleries. Your knowledge will set you free.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Paul Bogatay – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – Cowan Artist.



Paul Bogatay



I have presented to the readers many artists that aren't household names and I just came across one that I like myself. His name is Paul Bogatay and he did some extra special pottery pieces while being employed by Cowan in the 1920's and 30's. His plaques of athletic events caught my eye as I previewed the upcoming auction by my friends at The Cincinnati Art Gallery. These very colorful plaques with basketball, football, track, tennis and polo players were done after he left Cowan's and they would add to any collection of outstanding pottery pieces

The Paul Bogatay plaques will be sold at the Cincinnati sale on November the 7th starting at 10:00. I was able to find out very little about Mr. Bogatay except that he was born in 1905 and died in 1972. While at Cowan's he did commission pieces and after departing from the Cowan employment he produced some of his own pieces. These plaques are signed with his name and a date. How stunning these would look on my wall and perhaps there is a place for them in my home but I haven't asked Vickie yet and I do have my doubts that she would okay the purchase. Measuring over 16 inches each they would make quite a statement on a wall and I hope that you will go to the sale catalog online and view them.

Bogatay did a general line of pottery including bowls and figures but I believe his plaques were the best work that he did and I will let you be the judge for yourself. Even though these plaques have an estimate of $1500-$2000, I believe they could easily exceed that price. Here is the Paul Bogatay website and I hope you enjoy it. I believe that you will be the only dealer at the garage and house sales that recognizes this name so you should have the pick of the litter when it comes to Bogatay pieces.

I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Monday, October 26, 2009

Lalique – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectibles Blog – Blind Luck.


Lalique - Thanks to www.mickcollinsauctions.com


The old saying that you should take care of yourself because no one else will is one that I know from reading the Bible is not true. However I do think that we have a responsibility to take care of ourselves where possible. If you remember, I have often suggested that our members set something back for themselves after they have made the proper amount of profit on their transactions.


I try to do what I suggest you do and one way that I have done this is by keeping many of the Lalique pieces that I purchased, after doubling my money on the other things that were included with the Lalique. Over the last couple of years, I have been able to acquire perhaps 50 pieces of Lalique for very little money and decorate my home with them. Often I have been fortunate enough to buy these pieces for 5% - 10% of their retail price. I really have not thought about selling them until lately when I discovered that the prices on what I call current Lalique has been going up in value. Yes I never had a doubt that the Rene Lalique still commanded high prices, but I thought the newer pieces had basically no value at all. By using them in my home, the only way their value could go was up.

It might be time for our readers to take a second look at the contemporary Lalique because I believe there is money to be made there now. The last piece of Lalique that I purchased was a very large frosted vase with birds on it. I had already spent about $5000 with the seller when I spotted the vase and asked if because of my other purchases they would throw in the vase for $200. I had no idea what the retail price for the vase was but at $200 I knew I was safe. Their answer was yes so I had just added another piece to my personal collection and it sits in my china cabinet today. My friend in Los Angles that works for Neiman Marcus sent me a Lalique retail guide several years ago and flipping through it, I found my vase listed for $3250. Not a bad trinket to add to my ever expanding personal collection.

Just to mention a few of the items that comprise my collection, there are vase, decanters, figurines, bowls, lamps, compotes and perfumes. I wish that I had one of the Lalique hood ornaments but unfortunately I don't. You can be assured that this collection will continue to grow until I believe the true value for Lalique has once again been established. To my surprise I am seeing pieces of contemporary Lalique bringing 50% of their retail value on eBay and that would be my beginning selling point.

Here are just a few newer sales for Lalique on eBay: Bacchantes Vase 9 inch $1524.99, Champagne Cooler Ganymede $1240 – retail price $3000, Lucca Vase 11 inch $999.99 – retail price $1700. As you can see these and many more similar items are getting close to 50% of retail and that tells me it is time to be a buyer for Lalique. Also remember that many of the Lalique pieces are discontinued each year and that also increases their value. Be sure to look at the completed items for Lalique in eBay and get acquainted with the selling prices. It could make you money at the next sale you attend.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Sunday, October 25, 2009

Perfume Bottles – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – The ones that lie down.


Webb Perfume - Thanks to www.rarityfu.com



I have a personal love for French enameled and carved glass pieces. Some of the pieces that I cherish most were made by Daum Nancy and Galle but there were also other companies that made this beautiful glass. I have owned many vases by both companies plus other rare and unusual items like hanging lamps that they produced, however, there were some items they made that I bought that still puzzle me.

I have never been fully able to understand perfume bottles that couldn't stand up, even after being told it was so that ladies could carry them in their purses. Small bottles with flat tops would fit in a purse right. That answer doesn't even totally satisfy me today because what did the ladies do with the bottles when they were applying the perfume? If they held them in one hand to unscrew the top, what did they do next because if the bottle was laid down the perfume would spill out. If you have a better understanding than me on this matter please shoot me off an email.

A person could make a wonderful collection of these little perfume bottles with their wonderful enameled and carved exteriors that were often enhanced with silver overlay. Early's has some of the most beautiful bottles that I have ever seen coming to market in their October 30th sale. I would encourage you to go online and see what I am rambling on about. Vickie, my wife, has one of the Daum perfumes on her vanity and I don't think that there would be a chance in the world of ever talking her into selling it. I think I paid $20 for it so you could see that to sell it should bring a very favorable return. I would suggest that you add vintage perfume bottles to your list of items that can make you money.

I will be keeping my eye on two offerings at Early's: lots 636 and 637. The first one is a Daum Nancy French cameo glass and silver perfume bottle 6 ¼ in. height with embossed silver lid and foot. The decoration is green flowers and stars, estimate $800-$1000. The second bottle I will watch is very similar to the first, however, the flowers are red and the silver has a different design, plus it is 6 ½ in. Its estimate is $1200-$1800. I would love to add either one or both of these to my wife's collection even if they can't stand up. I said that there were other companies that made these perfume bottles that couldn't stand and one of those companies was Webb. You can see what they called their "teardrop perfumes" in the Early's catalog lots 567, 577 and 586. Stevens and Williams also made the teardrop perfumes as can be seen by looking at lot 594 of the same catalog. These small perfume bottles can start as low as $200 but also bring in thousands for the right piece.

These little beauties can make you money and often the prices for them at garage and house sales can be very reasonable. The gentleman that presents one of these beautiful pieces to a lady will bring a sparkle to her eyes.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Saturday, October 24, 2009

Depression Glass – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – Back to the basics.



Depression Glass - Thanks to countrypourch.com



I often wonder if all this knowledge that I have collected over the years will ever pay off again. I have watched as items that were selling for the big bucks became almost worthless and wondered if the prices for them would ever rise again. But you know the older I get, the more I see the cycles repeat themselves over and over again as times change.

When will cookie jars, cut glass, lunch boxes and so many other things become popular again? I can't tell you the date that those pieces will come back in favor but I can guarantee that they will. This is why you should never stop learning and cataloging the rare and unusual in your mind so that you will be prepared when the prices for an out of favor item become favorable again.

Let's take Depression Glass as an example. Twenty years ago, back in Kentucky, I was asked to visit a couple that had a large collection of Depression Glass. After driving for several hours, I arrived at the couple's house and they instructed me to follow them. We pulled up in front of a very old wooden slat house that was falling down. Even the steps leading up to it had rotted away. In the back of my mind I was asking what are we doing here. But that thought didn't last long because as we entered I could see that every room was filled with Depression Glass. There were thousands of pieces. Only in the country could this happen. There were no locks on the doors. I started looking through the stacks of glass but soon became overcome by the sheer number of items. There were the rarest of the rare which included every color of depression ever made, plus all the patterns, several containing animals. I asked what the price was and they said $25,000. I asked if it would be okay to give them an answer the next day to which they said that would be okay. I thought about it overnight and called with my offer which was yes to the $25,000, but I would only give them half until I had taken the pieces to my home in Owensboro, Kentucky and looked to see how much damage there was. If there wasn't any, I would give them the other half of the money. We never made a deal but if I had those pieces today I am sure that they would easily bring over $100,000.

My other great buy of Depression glass was when Warner and I visited Baltimore to buy Rookwood pottery and returned with 500 to 1000 pieces of Depression. We were so tired after the trip that it was consigned to Bunte Auction where I am sure it didn't bring 10% of its value because the pieces were sold in box lots, but we still made great money.

The reason I chose Depression Glass was I noticed a great article in Antique Trader about Depression and the fakes that are still showing up, so be careful. It also showed some values and they looked to me to be on the up trend. If you buy “The Collector's Encyclopedia of Depression Glass” by Gene Florence you can judge for yourself. There is another book that also might help you, “Kitchen Glassware of the Depression Years.” Look for these books on Amazon or Abebooks. The year really doesn't matter.

Here are just a few examples of current prices : Pink Sharon Cabbage Rose Covered Cheese Dish $2000, American Sweet Heart , Monax, Cream Soup Bowl $490, McKee Sugar Canister Jar, Robins egg Blue $395 and two Sharon Cabbage Rose Tumblers, Green $216.51. Buying these for $2 to $10 would make me smile and I hope that it would you also.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.


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Friday, October 23, 2009

Halloween – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – Frankenstein, but which one?


Curt Frankenstein



I can feel it in the air. Halloween is almost here. Witches and goblins and even a few monsters may be sneaking around, so be on guard. This is truly a time to be enjoyed with your kids because carving jack-o-lanterns and making costumes will bond you together forever. I still remember being out most of the night with my pillow case collecting ever type of goody known to man. Yes, there are some very special monsters on the loose and Frankenstein is one of the best, but not so fast.

Today we will be talking about Frankenstein, not the monster, but Curt Frankenstein, the artist. I once bought a print signed Curt Frankenstein and listed it on eBay because I couldn't find anything on him after searching several of the artist websites such as Ask Art and Artnet. To my surprise, I almost immediately started to get bids. I believe that the first one ended at around $300 and this definitely got my attention. Since that time I have had several of Frankenstein's pieces and have done well with everyone of them. You see there are very few dealers around the country that know the name and when they search their usual places, Curt's name doesn't appear there. In fact I have only found three or four of Curt's prints listed on eBay.

Often there are items that don't find their way into the regular channels of information that we count on but that doesn't mean that they don't have value and Curt Frankenstein's works fall into that category. If you are fortunate enough to find prints by this surrealist, count your blessings because they will bring you several hundred dollars and I have purchased several at $5.00 or less. I fact the last one I received was given to me because I purchased so many other items at the sale. See more about us at www.31corp.com.


I did find a website of his and this seems to be the proper place to list it for you.


CURT FRANKENSTEIN


Sad news: Curt Frankenstein passed away January 4th 2009.
If you have any questions please call: 847.256.4764


Curt Frankenstein is a well known painter and a printmaker, who came to the Chicago area from Germany when he was 25. He attended the American Academy of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Otis Art institute of Los Angeles. Subsequently he took courses in Lithography under Max Kahn at the Art Institute and in Etching under Hedi Bak at Studio 22 in Chicago. He now resides in Wilmette, IL, where he has a studio and print shop with his own etching press.

Curt Frankenstein first succeeded in selling his paintings in 1954 at the 57th Street Art Fair. He has continued to participate in art fairs ever since, still attending about six each year.

A Surrealist Painter: It was during the 1950s when abstract art was the attraction that Frankenstein found his calling. He was devoted to representational art, and after viewing surrealist paintings at the Art Institute, it was clear where his passion lied. Frankensteins's paintings tell a story. Paradoxes and Mysteries, he likes the tension between fantasy and reality. He uses familiar images in unfamiliar surprising ways. His paintings are realistic, but at the same time not real. His aim is to break up accustomed views of the world and to suggest that there is more to reality than meets the eye.



Thursday, October 22, 2009

eBay Now – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – Find Treasures


Thanks to EBAY


I have been both positive and negative on eBay over the years but now might be the time to search there for treasures. I received an email from one of my favorite readers, Vicki, and she asked my opinion of two items listed on eBay. It didn't take long for me to answer that both items met the rules for buying that are in our book, "31 Steps to Your Millions in Antiques and Collectibles." If these two items can be purchased close to the price they're listed for now, it should be an easy double of that price when they are resold.

How can that be, you must be asking. The first piece that I was asked to look at was a vase where the signature on the bottom was very hard to read. However, because of the script on its bottom there was no doubt who made it. This vase could easily bring $250 if its identity was known, so upon relisting this piece and attaching the company's name in the description, this vase should do quite well. I can't divulge the name of the piece because the auction is still running. The second piece was a glass figural lamp and I found where one just like it had sold a short time ago for much more in the completed listings on eBay. If Vicki is fortunate enough to purchase these two items, her return should be at least 100% of her investment. That would mean she had taken one step forward in her "Million Dollar Race" on that money.

I am beginning to see a pattern where people who are listing their items on eBay are taking very little time to describe them properly. In some cases this can be attributed to not being able to identify the piece because the name can't be read on the bottom or simply because it isn't signed. A knowledgeable dealer, however, still can identify it. Yes, this is where all those hours of pouring over auction catalogs and visiting antiques shows begin to pay off.

Here is a suggestion that might help you find a treasure on eBay. Enter "art glass" in eBay's search engine and as you skim through the listings, which should be many, watch for items that aren't properly identified. Next do the same with art pottery, paintings and porcelain. If you can find one piece each night, this could create that opportunity that you have been searching for to turn your life around. Other people's mistakes can be your good fortune and it costs you nothing but time. I will be more than glad to help you identify the pieces that you spot and hopefully, working together, this will put money in your pocket as it does Vicki's.

I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Surprise Surprise Curran – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – Call from an old friend.



Charles Courtney Curran



Today, as I was planning my next strategy for winning the “Million Dollar Race” that members of our club are participating in, I received a call from an old friend of mine. The conversation started something like this "Daryle, I just found the greatest painting that I have seen in many years on the Internet." You know me, that is when I had to ask who it was by and what was it about.

Before I could even get the words out of my mouth about the artist, my friend said in an almost gushing manner, "The painting is by Charles Courtney Curran and it is a beautiful portrait of a lady". He also shared with me that it was being sold at Shannon's Auction, which is one that I often recommend to our members as an excellent place to sell their paintings.

Not wanting to stop him from this excitement that he was exhibiting, but wanting to know the pre-sale estimate for the painting, I asked and he quickly quoted $50,000 to $70,000. This proved very interesting to me because I have been trying to sell two of Curran's paintings on our site and eBay for quite some time. There is a lesson to be learned from this. The current offering of Curran's is possibly one of the best portraits that I have ever seen and this confirms William's judgment of the painting. Because this painting is so exquisite, the price of $70,000 may not even be the top bid when the hammer falls. Unlike the lady's portrait, my offerings are two fairly simple landscapes that have very little to distinguish them and so I have been unable to get $5000 for the pair, even though they are well worth that amount. So you ask me, what is the lesson? Just because you find a painting by an artist that has very high posted auction results, it doesn't mean that there is an active market for every piece they did. Here is an example where you need to be comparing apples to apples.

I would highly recommend that you visit Shannon's home page and view the wonderful selection of paintings that are being offered on October the 29th. Here is the site Shannon's Auction.

I have to congratulate William for his excellent eye for fine paintings. He also shared with me that the last several months have been rather slow for him in this business but he has taken this period and religiously spent several hours each day in accumulating knowledge of the rare and unusual pieces of pottery, fine art, art glass and other antiques that have been mentioned in previous blogs. You can bet somewhere in the future you will be seeing blogs about the success of William in Houston.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Early's October Auction – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – The season for the best.


" New England Plater Amberina "


We are quickly coming into the prime time for antiques and fine art auctions. The best sales and prices usually come in the last three months of the year and I believe if you had the records available to you, the facts would bear it out. This is why I say that most high auction records are set in this time frame.

However, it is important to know how this fact can help us make money. There are several ways. First, by studying the catalogs from the major auction houses, you will have an excellent frame of reference in your treasure hunting because you will know what collectors are searching for. Second, by examining the sales results you will have an excellent idea what an item will sell for if you happen upon a similar one. But perhaps the most important thing that can be gleaned from these end of year sales, is the names of collectors that are looking to buy the best of the best and how you can contact them later. I spend more time talking to the audience at a sale than I do actually participating in the sale itself. By the end of each sale, I will have accumulated a list of buyers and what their specialties are so that I can contact them later. During the sale you shouldn't have to spend time studying what is being sold because you have already previewed the sales offerings.

Upcoming on October 30th is the Early Auction Company's “Fall Art Glass Auction” and I hope to be in attendance. The reason for this is because I want to hook up with old friends and make a few new ones.

Warner, one of the "Daryle Lambert Antique and Collectible Club", members and I have made a friend at a past Early's auction and now we know that this gentleman is one of the premier art glass collectors in the entire country. Why is this important you ask? Here is your answer. He is a wealth of information. We get to know what he is looking for and he can educate us on finding just the right pieces for him.


At this Early's sale there are two pieces of New England Plated Amberina that may be the top items at the sale and guess what, if I am correct our friend will be in on the bidding for both pieces. To show you how quality counts, neither one of these items are large, one being a toothpick holder and the other a sugar bowl. With estimates of $8,000 to $12,000 for each of these items, I can assure you I want to get to know their purchaser. Here is where you can see the upcoming Early's catalog www.earlyauctionco.com.

This is our time of year to make money and by the way, as others are saying that sales are slow, guess what? The three sculptures that I mentioned in a previous blog are all sold and the buyer is tremendously happy with the investment as well as the beauty of the pieces. I have seen the bronze that has been placed in a position of prominence in the living room of the buyer and it appears as if it were made for that location. Happy customers make happy dealers.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Monday, October 19, 2009

Harding Black – Daryle Lambert's Antique and Collectible Blog – Now I get homework.


Harding Black - Thanks to www.lifeofrilecollectiques.net



I have been asked to blog on the potter, Harding Black, by Cecil, one of the members of the "Daryle Lambert Antique and Collectible Club". This is the result of blogs I have written asking if anyone would like information on a particular person or item. I would be more than glad to share that information with our members.

Cecil informed me that he had found a piece by Mr. Black but knew little about him so he listed it on eBay. To his surprise, this small piece sold for several hundred dollars and now he wants to know more about the potter. I checked Askart and there wasn't anything but I did find a site that was quite interesting and I believe you will too. I hope that you will copy this site for future reference. This site is extensive so I thought rather than write a lot this morning I would just let you enjoy the information on this site. Please check it out thoroughly.


Harding Black Site.


Thanks Cecil and I hope this gives you the information you are looking for and that the other readers will enjoy it to.


I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.



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Sunday, October 18, 2009

Rene Buthaud – Daryle Lambert’s Antique and Collectible Blog – Lets try for three in a row.


Rene Buthaud



I feel like a kid with a new toy as I search for artist that can make money for our club members. I hope that you have enjoyed the last two blogs, but today I am going to share with you another, yet less known artist. In fact, it was difficult to even find a small bio on him but be assured his pieces bring excellent money and have a ready market if something he produced comes to market.

Rene Buthaud was born in 1886 and died in 1996 which meant he had a long life span and produced many wonderful pieces. Here is a small bio that was put together by the company, “Whiteford Fine Art” London.

BUTHAUD, RENÉ (French, 1886-1986)
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION click for works
back to artist list


An important Art Deco Artist, Buthaud trained at the École des Beaux Arts in Bordeaux. He designed simple stoneware forms, made for him by local potters, and used crackle glazes with which to decorate them. He was also influenced by African, tribal art, evident in those pieces where he used lusters or what he called ‘peau de serpent’ (snakeskin). Many of his best-known pieces are painted with supine female nudes. After 1940, he concentrated on images of women, in the form of stylized odalisques, idealized female figures, and mythological goddesses. Under contract to Galerie Rouard in Paris, he exhibited there from 1928 to 1965. During this period, he often signed his works "J. Doris

Believe it or not this was all of the information that I could find on the internet about Rene Buthaud but it is enough if you are fortunate enough to find a piece of his work. In the records it says that most of his pieces are signed so from the information above I would be looking for items signed “ J. Doris “ or his full name. He also used his monogram which I would assume would be his initials.

If any of our readers can find more information on Buthaud’s signature or monogram please share it with the other members of the “ Daryle Lambert Antique and Collectible Club “ in an email.

There has been a book written about Mr. Buthaud but it may be very difficult to obtain. The only copy that I could find was listed at $127.00.

What I am finding is that to push the envelope you may have to search for artist that most dealers haven’t heard of but rest assured that this knowledge will put you ahead of the class in making money in this business. Everyone is searching for the common names we hear everyday but those obscure artists that have built a reputation in the art world may be passed by if the dealers haven’t spent their time in the books or on the internet. This is where you come in and I will list just a few of Buthaud’s works to wet your appetite.

1. Buste de femme – Terracotta – 2.60 “ – Paris auction 12/07/2007 $13,300 signed with monogram

2. Femme a la Gazelle 43 by 70 inches silver and glass 12/13/1999 – Paris - $24,600.

3. Peon – de – Serpent – Glazed stoneware 12 ½ “ – Vase – Christie’s - $15,000.







I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.





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Saturday, October 17, 2009

Peter Voulkos – Daryle Lambert’s Antique and Collectible Blog – Second Try.

Peter Vouklos - Thanks to www.frankloyd.com

I am having more fun than a person should be entitled to as I search for new faces that I can present to the Daryle Lambert’s Antique and Collectibles club members. I never thought that there were so many great artists working in pottery that I wasn’t familiar with.

I am sure that this information on these artists has been kept secret by the ones in the know because there is a great deal of money to be made by finding works by these artists. The latest find that I have made is Peter Voulkos who was born in 1924 in Bozeman, Montana and died in 2002 in Bowling Green, Ohio.

Mr. Voulkos had a long and distinguished career which included teaching at some of this country’s most outstanding colleges and universities from 1952 -1985. He taught at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, The University of Montana and The University of California before retiring in 1985. To his credit, he was awarded so many honors that I can’t list them all here in the blog but his last honor was the Visionaria Award in 2002. This was presented to him by the American Craft Museum in New York. You may find more facts about Peter Vouklos at this site.
Peter Vouklos


I am still trying to figure out what makes an artist special because when I see the works of George Ohr, Toshiko Takaezu and now Peter Vouklos it will take more time and study before I can appreciate their quality but I am working on it. Someone must have already figured it out however, because of the price achieved at auction for their works are amazing.

Peter Voulkos wasn’t only accomplished with pottery but also paintings and bronzes.
In fact, the most expensive piece of Voulkos’s work was a painting called “Passing Red” that sold at Butterfield’s in 2008 for $108,000. His next highest listing was for a stoneware sculpture created in 1956 that brought $85,000 at Wright’s auction in Chicago in 2005. The list goes on - ceramic sculpture at Christie’s “Big Snake River” in 1990 for $55,000. “Stack”, a stoneware sculpture, sold at Sotheby’s in 2005 for $51,000.

These prices make me hunger for the opportunity to own one or more of Vouklos’s works and they may be at the next garage or house sale I attend. Could one be waiting for you? To find out if there is a work by Vouklos with your name on it requires getting out of the house which I am sure you are doing. So it is just a matter of time before one of these treasures come your way.





I hope that in the future we will be able to receive comments on the blog but that doesn't seem to be happening at the present time. I would appreciate if you would send all comment to www.31corp.com until I can solve this problem.


My 220 page book about how to make money buying and selling antiques & collectibles is FREE with your membership in the 31 Club. Join Us Today!